Posts Tagged ‘experiences’

Taking Photographs Weakens Memories, Psychological Study Finds

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Here’s something that both photographers and the typical millennial have to look forward to in old age: Your memory is going to suck because of all the photos you took when you should have been paying attention to what was happening around you.

That’s the upshot of a new psychological study that finds you can have a good photographic record of an event or a good memory, but not both. Read more…

Photographing the Endangered European Red Squirrel

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Red squirrels are my favourite subject to photograph. They each have their own individual personalities, and I love to try and capture their characters in my images. Their natural curiosity makes them great photography subjects, as they will quickly get used to my presence and act naturally in front of me.
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10 Ways Photography Can Change Your Life (It Changed Mine)

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I have always been interested in photos. When I was younger, I used to pore through drawers of photos and photo albums that my parents made, looking at them, rearranging them and remembering the moment that they were taken.

I loved those photos. When I went to college and returned home for holidays and summers, I would always return to those drawers, collect the photos to view the new ones and to catch up on everything that had happened while I was away. When I looked at the pictures, I tried to imagine myself there and what I would have been doing at that time.
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Hear What It’s Like to Serve as an Official White House Photographer

As a followup to our post earlier today about former White House photographer Eric Draper’s work, here’s an interesting and relevant 17-minute-long story that aired on NPR in January of this year. It’s an interview with former presidential photographers Eric Draper and Robert McNeely, who photographed the presidencies of George W. Bush and Bill Clinton (respectively).
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Photographers Tell the Stories Behind Their Worst Shots

The Guardian published an article yesterday that features a number of prominent photographers (e.g. Jane Bown, Martin Parr, Terry O’Neil, Platon) sharing about missed photo opportunities and their “worst shots”. Platon has an interesting story regarding photographing Iranian president Ahmadinejad back in 2009 while snapping portraits of world leaders:

Ahmadinejad was the biggest surprise. On the first day, he made one of the most controversial speeches ever given at the UN, and a large proportion of the auditorium walked out. As he left the stage his supporters swarmed him, patting his back and shaking his hand. There were about 150 people pulling him in different directions. I elbowed my way into the middle of the scrum, grabbed both his hands, looked into his eyes and said, “Come with me, I am going to take your picture.” As I gently pulled his hands, miraculously he started to follow me to my studio.

I was expecting to get that dictatorial menace he had shown in his speech. But he suddenly realised that, not only was he about to sit for the most intimate portrait of him ever, the crowd was also watching. They were all cheering; he lost his composure for a second and started to laugh. What I got was him trying to regain his composure. It’s the most sinister leer I’ve caught on film.

It was a missed opportunity, in the sense that he was trying to gather himself and deal with the embarrassment of performing in front of all those people. On the other hand, it gave me something I would never have expected. No one thinks of Ahmadinejad as a man with a hint of a smile.

My best shot: The one that got away [The Guardian]

A War Photographer’s Battle for Peace of Mind

This weekend, CNN is featuring this video showing renowned war photographer Don McCullin talking about his experiences, his work, and his current struggle to find peace.