Posts Tagged ‘Equipment’

Rent Out and Borrow Studio Resources with StudioShare

Here’s a pretty cool idea: StudioShare.org is a website through which individuals can rent studio gear or space from each other. Members can either simply sign up to rent, or if they’re a studio owner, they can sign up to both rent and to rent out their studio space. All members can rent out their gear if they wish, though it’s probably a good idea to get equipment insurance first.

Photographers can also set up collaborations with each other using the site, as well as offer their creative services for studio shoots — and services aren’t limited to photographers, it could include stylists, makeup artists, and other creative talents.

The site streamlines all the prep for a photo shoot, from the creative services to the gear, lighting, and space. The site also emphasizes the human element of photo shoots, allowing users to network with each other and to share portfolios and resumes.

Membership starts at $49 and StudioShare takes a 20% commission on rates set by resource owners.

One drawback to the service is that it is relatively small right now, with less than 2,000 members in the United States with a rather thin distribution. Since the available stock and resources depend on that number and location of members, it might be a bit early to jump in as a renting member until the pool of studio and equipment owners grows.

StudioShare.org (via Small Aperture)

Likea Pinhole Camera Looks Like A Leica

Always wanted a manual Leica but couldn’t afford it? This Likea pinhole camera may not reproduce Leica-quality photos, or necessarily feel like a Leica (it’s made from card stock), but it looks like one! Though it may be more manual than you can handle: for $20, you just get the Likea MPH kit that you’ll still need to assemble. And you’ll have to make your own pinhole part out of a soda can. But after all, it’s not the camera that makes the photographer.

(via Wired)

Pinhole Camera Made From iPhone Box

There’s no app for this: Etsy seller Erin Paysse designed this pinhole camera out of an iPhone box. It’s been done before with an iPod box, but Paysse added a clean, retro touch to the camera. She’s selling the camera for $80, as well as some prints produced by the camera for $25.

Check out her store to see more creative pinhole cameras made out of  boxes and books.

(via Boing Boing)

7 Easy Steps for Instant Cashback on Photo Gear Using eBay

A while ago my friend discovered Microsoft’s Bing Cashback program, which provides instant savings for “qualified” purchases. What’s neat is that any eBay purchase made with “Buy It Now” and paid using PayPal qualifies for the savings. After he discovered this, my friend bought Canon 5Ds in bulk on eBay and sold them on craigslist for a profit.

I just bought a used 5D yesterday on eBay for $1200, and instantly saved about $100 using this method. Here it is as a step-by-step tutorial:

1. Search for the Product on Bing

Head on over to Microsoft’s Bing search engine to search for your product.

2. Click the Sponsored eBay Link

In many cases you’ll find the link in the sponsored sites box. If you don’t, just type in something else until you do find an eBay link (i.e. “Canon 5D”). It doesn’t need to be the item you’re looking to purchase. As long as you enter eBay through a sponsored link on Bing you’ll be qualified for cashback.

2. Check the Top of the Page

At this point, there should e a special “Microsoft Cashback” graphic at the top of the page, with the text “Must use Buy It Now and PayPal”. As long as you see this, you’re good to go. If you don’t enter eBay through the sponsored link on Bing, you won’t see this and you won’t be participating in the program.

3. Find Your Item

You can now search for any item you’d like to buy, using eBay just like you normally would. You have 60 minutes to find and buy what you’re looking for before the cashback expires. If it does expire, all you need to do is start over and reenter eBay through Bing. It’s really that easy!

Since the program requires that you Buy It Now, it makes sense to filter by Buy It Now listings, and to sort by price from lowest to highest.

4. Purchase the Item Using Buy It Now

Make sure the special graphic at the top from Step 2 is still visible. If it is, click “Buy It Now” to purchase the item.

5. Check the Review Page

After clicking the “Buy It Now” button, eBay takes you to a confirmation page to allow you to review what you’re getting into. If you’ve done the previous steps correctly, this page will also have a special “Microsoft cashback” box that tells you exactly how much cash you’re going to get back with the purchase. If everything looks right, hit the “Commit to Buy” button to make the purchase final.

6. Pay Using PayPal

Pay for the item like you normally would using PayPal. As long as you pay using PayPal, you’ll get the cashback.

7. Sign Up for the Bing Cashback Program

Once you’ve purchased the item, you’ll receive an eBay message in your account telling you to check your Microsoft Cashback page. If you don’t have one, you can create one at this time. Make sure you create your account through the link provide in the message.

The signup is very fast and simple.

You will soon find the cashback amount show up on your account. Ordinarily, cashback takes 60 days. However, if you sign up for an account beforehand, you can go into your Microsoft Cashback settings and join the “quick cashback program.” This allows you to have the cash sent to your PayPal account very shortly after the purchase (sometimes immediately).


That’s it! What’s great about this program is that you can use it for anything on eBay as long as you use Buy It Now and PayPal. After buying the 5D yesterday, I used the program to purchase a VGA adapter for my MacBook Pro, and saved 8% on that as well in addition to the low 3rd-party price I found on eBay.

Good luck, and leave a comment letting us know how it goes!

Uber-Rare Nikon 6mm Fisheye Lens on eBay Can See Behind Itself

There’s a super rare Nikkor 6mm f/2.8 fisheye lens for sale on eBay. How much does f/2.8, 6mm, and a 220° field of view cost? A mere $34,020.

Aside from this uber-rare lens being uber-expensive, it’s also ridiculously heavy, weighing in at close to 11.5 pounds. Here’s what Photography in Malaysia has to say about this lens:

You are looking at one of the most gorgeous looking lens in 35mm SLR photography – a lens that can actually see behind itself! This series of lenses were originally developed for special scientific and industrial use where wider-than-180° picture coverage is required in surveillance work, photographing the interiors of pipes, boilers, conduits, cylinder bores and other constricted areas. But in applications such as advertising and commercial photography they are used extensively for dramatic effects.

To put the field of view in perspective, human vision is about 180°.

(via Photojojo)

Uber Flexible Tripod Heads by Induro

There’s a video demonstration of a Chinese military shovel that’s becoming quite popular on YouTube. Induro’s PHQ-Series tripod heads are similar in that they seem to do a little of everything. These are a cross between flexible ball-heads and accurate pan-heads, offer five directions of precise control (quintaxial positioning), and are equipped with five different bubble levels to help you adjust. Want to take 3D photographs? There’s a feature for that.

The PHQ1 for smaller cameras will cost $230, while the PHQ3 will sell for $290.

(via Wired)

Rare 2000mm Nikon Lens on eBay

There’s a Nikon 11/2000mm Reflex-Nikkor-C lens for sale on eBay. The price? A mere $19,950.

This page has more information on this rare lens:

This is the longest reaching and the largest dimension Nikkor optical lens for 35mm photography [...] This rarely seen lens was believed to be hand made and on a special order basis. It was generally been seen finished in white colour which carries the purpose of minimizing thermal effect if use frequently in the field [...] Neither the lens is easy to carry along nor friendly to handle as its dimension and weight factor often require time consuming setup for shooting.

The thing isn’t “easy to carry” because it weighs about 39 pounds. It’s also fixed at f/11, so you’ll need good light and stabilization to use it effectively.

(via Nikon Rumors)

Polaroid Film Returns from the Dead

Time to dust off your old Polaroid cameras. The Impossible Project has just unveiled its new PX100 and PX600 instant films for Polaroid cameras, after a three year effort to save Polaroid photography from extinction. The $21 packs, available starting Thursday, will each provide 8 black and white images. Color film packs are also expected to be released sometime this summer.

PX100 film is for the SX-70 Polaroid camera from the 1970′s, while PX600 is for more recent cameras that take 600-series film. While the new film will not carry Polaroid branding, new Polaroid instant film cameras that use the film have been announced. The company plans to produce more than 1 million packs in the first year.

Do you love Polaroid enough to pick it up again for $2-3 a shot?

Cloak: The Always Ready Camera Bag

The Cloak Bag is a minimalistic camera bag with a pretty unique feature: it allows you to photograph without removing your camera.

The bag features a zip-open bottom that can be rolled in on itself to adjust the height for various lenses, and slits in the sides allow you to use the camera as you normally would.

To secure the camera to the bag, you replace your camera strap with a special strap that attaches to the bag using velcro. This means the bag may not be compatible with special straps (i.e. an R-Strap) you might use.

You can order one yourself for $49 directly from their website.

I think the idea is pretty neat, though you might look a bit funny holding a bag up to your face. Perhaps you can pretend you’re drinking out of it…

(via PhotographyBLOG)

Buttons: A Blind Concept Camera

Buttons is a concept camera by Sascha Pohflepp that lacks traditional camera functionality. Rather than taking photographs, it displays photographs that other people took at the moment you pressed the button. Pohflepp explains,

Buttons takes on this notion of the camera as a networked object. It is a camera that will capture a moment at the press of a button. However, unlike a conventional analog or digital camera, this one doesn’t have any optical parts. It allows you to capture your moment but in doing so, it effectively seperates it from the subject. Instead, as you will memorize the moment, the camera memorizes only the time and starts to continuously search on the net for other photos that have been taken in the very same moment.

Essentially, it is a camera that – using a mobile communication device – takes other’s photos. Photos that were created by someone who pressed a button somewhere at the same time as its own button was pressed. Even more so, it reduces the cameras to their networked buttons in order to create a link between two individuals.

So how does it work? Flickr, of course! The SonyEricsson K750i inside the device contacts a server that searches Flickr for photographs taken at the requested moment. As soon as a match is found, it is transmitted to the “camera” and displayed on the screen. The press-to-view process could take a “few minutes or hours”.

(via Trend Hunter)