Posts Tagged ‘dust’

Hoya EVO Antistatic Filters Help Keep Dust Off Your Glass and Out of Your Shots

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Sick of wiping and blowing dust off your lens filter? Check out Hoya’s new line of EVO Antistatic lens filters, which actively repel dust particles to keep them from sticking to the glass.
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Nikon Allocates $17.7 Million to Repair D600 Issues… and Its Reputation

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If you’re wondering just how big of a pain in the butt for Nikon the D600 sensor oil/dust issues have been, all you have to do is go back into our archives and read about the lawsuits and the outrage… or read the comments on the D610 announcement post.

On the off-chance that’s not enough, however, we now have a dollar figure to add to the mix. $17.7 million. That’s how much Nikon has allocated to put an end to the D600 issues and repair its damaged reputation. Read more…

Nikon Takes D600 Fix to the Next Level, Will Replace D600s if Service Doesn’t Work

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News that Nikon had been replacing some defective D600s with brand new D610s broke months ago, but it wasn’t confirmed officially until late last night when Nikon announced the news itself. Read more…

Law Firms Lining Up to File Class Action Lawsuits Over the D600 Dust/Oil Issue

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Just over a week ago, we reported on the news that a US law firm was collecting information from disgruntled Nikon D600 users for a potential class action lawsuit. Well, it turns out they’re actually late to the game. Three days after that story broke, a few other law firms actually filed a class action suit against the Japanese camera giant. Read more…

US Law Firm Collecting D600 Sensor Dust Complaints for Possible Class Action Suit

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A US law firm is in the process of collecting information from upset Nikon D600 owners to possibly file a class action lawsuit against the Japanese camera giant over the D600′s widely-reported sensor dust/oil issues. Read more…

Sensor Gel Stick: Safely Clean Your Sensor Like They Do at the Service Center

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Sensor cleaning, especially if you’ve never tried to do it yourself, is a scary prospect. Sure, taking off your lens and using a rocket blower isn’t all that nerve-wracking, but start talking to someone about wet cleaning a sensors and beads of perspiration will immediately begin to accumulate on their newly-furrowed brow.

Fortunately, there’s a cleaning solution now available that is easy and safe enough that many a sensor-cleaning newb will want to give it a try: the Sensor Gel Stick. Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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How to Open Up and Clean Your iPhone 5 Camera

Although cracking open your smartphone and possibly voiding the warranty is never a pleasant task, sometimes it’s necessary. For example, YouTube handyman JerryRigEverything‘s friend recently dropped his iPhone 5 and started getting some serious dust buildup on his front and rear cameras.

In the above video, Jerry shows you how he opens up his friend’s iPhone and performs a quick cleaning job on both cameras to get them shooting good as new. (Note: If you choose to try this at home, you do so at your own risk) Read more…

How to Do DIY Dust Cleaning Surgery on 6 Popular Canon and Nikon Lenses

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Here’s a question I get asked about 15 times a week: “How can I get the dust out of my lens?” The right answer is you don’t. All lenses have dust in them and it doesn’t affect the images at all 99% of the time. Even if you clean it all out, it will be back after you use the lens a few times.

There are occasionally times that large dust specs very near the rear element are visible in an image, though. There also is the very real issue of resale value; a dusty lens tends to bring a lower price than one without much dust. The right answer in these cases is “send it in for factory service, they’ll disassemble it and clean it.” Doing it yourself is risky.
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Nikon D600 Speck Issue May Be Limited to First Few Thousand Shots

Photographer Kyle Clementstime-lapse showing specks accumulating on the Nikon D600 over the first 1000 shots has been seen by nearly 200,000 people around the web in less than a week. Through the exposure his experiment has gotten, Clements received a good deal of feedback and suggestions regarding further experiments and what the specks might be. He has since done two new time-lapse experiments that sheds a little more light on the issue.
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Theory: Nikon D600 Sensor Dust Problem Caused by Scratches in the Mirror Box?

It has been widely reported that the new Nikon D600 full-frame DSLR suffers from a higher-than-normal amount of dark spots appearing on the sensor. Yesterday we shared one photographer’s time-lapse video that demonstrates that the issue occurs right out of the box without any lens swaps.

Photographer Daniel Gaworski has been experiencing the same problem, and decided to take a closer look at his D600. He discovered that his camera’s shutter curtain contains scratch marks on the bottom flap (see above), particularly in one corner of the camera.
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