Posts Tagged ‘drawing’

Valentine’s Day Meets Pulp Fiction in This Creative Stop Motion Video

There’s no use ignoring it, it’s Valentine’s day, and that means some cool photography related Valentine’s stuff will invariably make it onto PetaPixel. No worries though, it’s not all going to be sappy and romantic. Some of what we’ll share, like this awesome 15-second stop-motion video, is downright hardcore. Read more…

Representations: Photographs of Everyday Objects Made to Look Like Drawings

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For some reason we’re fascinated by photographs of real things made to look like drawings or paintings. Series like Alexander Khokhlov’s 2D or Not 2D and pretty much Alexa Meade’s entire portfolio are great examples of this.

Now we have another similar series to share with you. Created by artist Cynthia Greig, Representations is a series of photographs of everyday objects that have been white washed and outlined so that they look like very simple drawings. Read more…

Zany Picture Frame Concept Encourages ‘Vandalism,’ Let You Draw on Your Pics

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Typically, the only people who would take a marker to your pictures would be your kids when you’re not paying attention. But wouldn’t it be at least a little fun to pretend you were a kid again, take out a marker, and just go to town on a few of your photos?

Designer Brian Khouw obviously thinks so, which is why he came up with a concept picture frame dubbed the Vandalijst — a frame that actually encourages you to doodle on your photos. Read more…

Artist Has Self-Portrait Painting Approved as Drivers License Photograph

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Check out this portrait photograph of Swedish artist Fredrik Saker. It’s actually a self-portrait that Saker painted by hand. While we’ve seen and shared photo-realistic drawings before, Saker’s came up with a clever way of validating his photo’s realism: he managed to have it approved as his drivers license photo.
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Self-Portrait Machine Turns Your Hand Into a Photo Printer

“Blind Self-Portrait” is a project by artists Kyle McDonald and Matt Mets that’s based around a machine that can help you turn photographs into sketches. The machine constantly track’s the subject’s face using a camera and translates the image into a line-drawing and x- and y-coordinates. The user then rests their hand on the machine’s “hand” and presses a pen into a piece of paper. The robot hand does the rest of the work, guiding the hand into drawing the photograph as the person sits back and watches the magic happen.
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The Anatomy of a Canon 5D Mark II

So this is what a Canon 5D Mark II looks like on the inside. This anatomy illustration was done by concept artist Mads Peitersen, who created similar illustrations for other popular devices as well. Peiterson tells us,

The idea was that these gadgets are becoming so advanced and cool today that we almost treat them as if they were alive. In a way users become attached to them. You kinda begin to see yourself as connected to these brands or gadgets. They almost become an extension of yourself or your hands.

The metaphor is that a really rather simple and very dead gadget gives people a feeling of being more present, more alive. And in this case, the camera even sees and captures life.

Maybe this is what a Zerg version of the Canon 5D Mark II might look like…

(via Gizmodo)


Image credit: Illustration by Mads Peitersen and used with permission

Blending the Pencil with the Camera

Pencil Vs Camera! is a wonderful series of photographs by Belgian photographer and painter Ben Heine in which he blends his pencil sketches with photographs to create new realities:

Heine tells us,

Pencil vs. Camera! is the continuation of many years of graphic research. These pictures show not only the battle between photography and drawing, but also between reality and imagination. I think this work can lead to many different forms of expression, because it gives a clear message while traveling into surreal worlds in the same time.

To see more of Heine’s work, check out his Flickr photostream.


Image credits: Photographs by Ben Heine and used with permission