Posts Tagged ‘documentary’

Making of ‘Watermark': Documenting the Amazing Aerial Work of Edward Burtynsky

The aerial photography work of Edward Burtynsky is spectacular. So much so that Canadian filmmakers Jennifer Baichwal and Nick de Pencier — the creators of the Burtynsky documentary Manufactured Landscapes — are featuring him in yet another visual stunner called Watermark. Read more…

Pentax ‘Anti-Commercial’ Doesn’t Show the Camera Once, Is Incredibly Compelling

If you’re commissioned to make an ad for a major camera company, might we make a small suggestion? Don’t show any cameras. It might seem like a stupid idea on the surface, but when you consider the effectiveness of the Canon ad we shared a couple of weeks ago and this Pentax ad we’re sharing today, you might just agree with us. Read more…

Photographing Two Stunning Atolls in the Indian Ocean, A Behind The Scenes Look

Marine biologist turned photographer Thomas Peschak spent some time documenting the remote atolls of Bassas de India and Europa, known to be home of some of the most beautiful seascapes in the world.

While doing so, cameraman Dan Beecham and writer Sunnye Collins created a behind the scenes video showing how Peschak went about capturing the beautiful scenery. Read more…

This Nikon D4s Film About Photographers Using the D4s Was Shot on a D4s… D4s

In the (slightly paraphrased) words of rapper and former Pimp My Ride host Xzibit, “Yo dawgs, we heard you liked the Nikon D4s, so here’s a video about the D4s, shot on a D4s”. Read more…

Professional Skydive Photographer Puts the Nikon D5300 Through Its Paces

Apparently the newest, coolest way to show off your new camera is by sending it up with some professional skydivers and telling them to have at it. Okay, maybe it’s too early to spot a trend, but Nikon did recently decide to follow in Sony’s footsteps and send a couple of D5300s up with a pro skydive photographer to show them off. Read more…

Interview with Photographer Dave Jordano About ‘Detroit: Unbroken Down’

Marcus and Bey-Bey, Eastside, Detroit 2012

Marcus and Bey-Bey, Eastside, Detroit 2012

Dave Jordano is an award-winning documentary photographer based in Chicago, IL. Jordano has exhibited widely and his work is in several private, corporate and museum collections, most notably The Museum of Contemporary Photography, Chicago, the Museum of Fine Arts, Houston, the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, and the Detroit Institute of Arts.

He published his first book titled “Articles of Faith” in April 2009 by The Center for American Places, Columbia College Press. His current project, Detroit: Unbroken Down, documents the cultural and societal identity of his hometown, Detroit. Read more…

Beyond: Flemming Bo Jensen on Living as a Nomad Photographer

Those readers who often find themselves afflicted with a serious case of wanderlust might want to avoid this post. In the 10-minute documentary above, director Charlene Winfred will take you on a journey with self-proclaimed “gypsy” and “nomad” photographer Flemming Bo Jensen that will have you reaching for your camera gear with one hand while you shop for plane tickets online with the other. Read more…

‘Long Live Film’ Documentary Explores Love for Analog Photography

ScreenHunter_136 Sep. 12 12.02

Congratulations, new adopters of film photography — you’re now officially a subculture!

The defining point, of course, is having an independent documentary film about your movement, and that’s just what mail-order processor Indie Film Lab is doing with “Long Live Film.”
Read more…

Man on Bridge: The Dublin Street Photog Who Worked the Same Spot for 50 Years

The world of photography holds many untold stories of men and women who had a profound impact on the lives of the people on the other side of their lens. One such man was Dublin street photographer Arthur Fields, and an Irish production company wants to tell his story, with a little help from you. Read more…

Photographer Captures Outdoor Scenes Inside His Tiny Indoor Studio

ScreenHunter_41 Jul. 23 13.00

So you want to create stirring nature documentaries. You could go the National Geographic way and risk trench-foot, snakebite and more in pursuit of the scenic wild. Or you could take the Boris Godfroid route: Schlep a few hundred pounds of bricks into a spare room, cover it with moss and other forgiving plant life, and let nature run wild in miniature.
Read more…