Posts Tagged ‘discussion’

Kodak Isn’t Doing So Hot These Days

What you see here is the history of Kodak stock starting from 1978. In the mid-1990s the stock peaked at over $90 per share, but has experienced a slow demise since then, and is currently at $3.70 a share. What’s more, the company just announced yesterday that profits fell a staggering 95% in the fourth quarter of 2010. During that quarter the company earned just $22 million, compared to the $443 million it earned during the same period a year earlier.

Acquisition rumors have been swirling around for quite some time now as the stock continues its free fall. Any predictions on what will become of this once-great company?

Kodak profit plunges 95%; sales fall short (via Photo Rumors)


Update: Kodak still sees a “big silver lining” amidst all this bad news.

Leica MP-36 Owned by “Famous Photographer” Listed on eBay for $104K

There’s an old beat up Leica MP-36 being sold by a reputable seller on eBay (8533 feedback score with 99.4% positive) for the staggering price of $104,000. What’s strange is that the details provided in the listing are quite sparse. The page includes a few photographs and the description,

The camera comes with matching black paint Summicron 2/5cm no.1474879, first version with black bayonet mount, a matching black paint Leicavit MP. The camera was the property of famous photographer

Perhaps some crowdsourced investigation can shed some light on this unique listing. Any idea what’s so special about this camera and/or who the “famous photographer” mentioned is? Check out the listing here.


Update: Apparently the camera belonged to Leif Engberg. Kudos to Nutzibe


Update: Wow. Looks like the camera actually sold for $104K… Gizmodo jumped on the story here.


Thanks for the tip, Christian!

Flickr User Protests Deleted Pro Account

Flickr member Deeepa Praveen 4-year-old pro account was deleted recently without any warning or explanation, and in response she created this graphic showing what she lost in the blink of an eye. While Flickr is undoubtedly one of the best photo-sharing services on the web right now, the fact that pro accounts can be permanently deleted without any warning doesn’t sit too well with many users. Even if the deleted accounts deserved to be removed, it would be much nicer if they followed a notice and were temporarily removed at first.

What are your thoughts on how Flickr handles account deletions?

(via Thomas Hawk)

The History of Photography According to Google Books

Google’s new Books Ngram Viewer is a cool new site that allows you to search for words and view a graph of how the usage of that word has fluctuated over time. A quick search of the word “photography” in books published between 1835 and 2008 provides a pretty interesting look at the history of photography.
Read more…

Winning Photo of the $80,000 Moran Contemporary Photographic Prize

A couple days ago we covered the winning image of the British Journal of Photography’s international photo contest and how many readers disagreed with the photo’s merits. The prize for that contest was a one week exhibition and a Sigma digital compact camera. Now compare that to the above photograph, which won AU $80,000 in the 2010 Moran Contemporary Photographic Prize, one of the richest prizes in the world. Like the BJP photo, this photograph became the subject of debate.
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Sleeping Man Photo Wins BJP Award but Gets Bashed by Readers

The British Journal of Photography announced recently that South African photographer Michelle Sank’s image “Man asleep on the Golden Mile, Durban, South Africa.” had won the single image category of its International Photography Award.

The image, which shows a man asleep in a park just off the Golden Mile in Durban, was described by judges Nick Galvin, Bruno Ceschel and Diane Smyth as both surreal and disturbing, and was picked out from 338 other entries because of its quiet, enduring intensity. “The more I look at it, the more powerful it becomes,” commented Galvin, who manages the archive at Magnum London.

Read more…

Award-Winning Photogs Discussing the Power of Photojournalism

If you have 20 minutes to spare, here’s an interesting video in which winning photographers of the 66th Pictures of the Year International contest discuss the power of photojournalism and some of their work. This is similar to the “What Makes a Great Picture?” by National Geographic that we shared back in September.
Watch part two after the break

Nikon Aims to Create New Camera Market

Nikon’s President Makoto Kimura did an interview with Reuters a couple days ago in which he stated that Nikon is trying to develop a camera that creates a new camera market.

A lot of companies make bold claims about their upcoming products “changing photography forever”, but the products usually don’t deliver much beyond increased megapixels, improvements in quality, and flashier specs. Sony actually succeeded in changing the landscape of DSLRs recently with their new pellicle mirror cameras.

In addition to Nikon, Pentax is also rumored to be developing a camera that is unlike any existing camera on the market.

Here’s the specific quote made by Kimura,

We want to propose another type of photography. I don’t think there is any need to limit it to two categories. We want to create a new market.

Let’s put on our thinking caps. What do you think these companies might have up their sleeves? Can you think of anything they might be building that might actually change the digital camera industry?

Nikon says preparing camera to create ‘new market’ (via Nikon Rumors)

Comparing Digital Imaging Technology to the Human Eye

There’s an interesting discussion going on over at the DPReview forums regarding how the human eye compares to the technology we have in digital cameras.

Here are some of the findings that were compiled from various sources on the web:

  • Sensor size: 22mm in diameter
  • Resolution: 576 megapixels
  • Sensitivity: 1 – 800 ISO
  • Focal length: 22mm – 35mm
  • Aperture: f/2.1 – f/8.3

Another interesting idea that came up was the possibility of using the human eye as the lens and sensor for future imaging devices:

Maybe future “cameras” will actually link to your eyes – since the eyeball is such a great lens, who knows? Getting signal from the eye is the trick – would require a surgical implant or a means of reading brainwaves. Maybe that’s 200 years out – similar time [frame] the Mayo clinic is talking about for correcting double/triple vision.

Perhaps in the future we’ll all be documenting our lives at 576 megapixels through our eyes and ears, and storing the photos and videos on petabyte external hard drives at home.

What do you think of this discussion? Is there anything that jumps out at you as being wrong, or do you agree with the comparison for the most part?


Image credit: Eye (please add some funny TAGs) by Michele Catania

Homebrew Scanner Captures 2.5D Photos

Photography and electronics enthusiast Michal Zalewski recently built a simple scanning device using a diode laser and custom gearbox that allows him to create 2.5D images when used with a Canon 5D Mark II. These are regular photographs that are enhanced with accurate per-pixel depth information.

Here’s an example Zalewski gives of a regular photograph and its scan data:

Cameras used for everyday photography do not record any information about how far away things in the photograph are. They simply record what they “see”. A 2.5D camera would allow you to capture photographs with apertures (i.e. a large depth of field), and then decide the focus and depth of field afterward in post-processing.

For an example of what this means, check out this interactive demonstration with chess pieces where you can click the image to bring the area into focus.

Could this be the next step in the evolution of photography?