Posts Tagged ‘discussion’

A Discussion About the Term ‘Shutter Speed’ Being a Misnomer That Stuck

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The word “speed” is used a lot in the world of photography equipment — things like lens speed, film speed, and shutter speed. But speed is generally used to refer to how quickly something travels or operates per unit time, rather than a period of time itself. So is the term “shutter speed” a misnomer?
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Garry Winogrand Talks to University Students About Photography in 1977

Garry Winogrand was one of the most notable and prolific American street photographers of the 20th century. He is known for capturing a vast record of what American life was like during the decades following World War II; in addition to his published works, thousands of his undeveloped and unseen rolls of film were discovered when he passed away in 1984.

In 1977, Winogrand was invited to speak to Rice Students about photography. Over the course of two hours, the photographer answered all kinds of questions and discussed a wide range of topics regarding photography, his work, and his thoughts.
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Columnist: Prince Harry Photographing Africans with Fujifilm X100 is ‘Arrogant’ and ‘Colonial’

Prince Harry takes a photograph during a visit to a herd boy night school

Guardian columnist Jonathan Jones is a master of sparking controversy in the world of photography. As you might remember, he’s the guy who keeps arguing that photography is not art… a year after calling it “the art of our time.”

His latest target is the above photograph showing Prince Harry shooting with a Fujifilm X100 during a trip to Lesotho in Africa. Jones argues that it’s “as arrogant as any colonial portrait.”
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external Should News Outlets Publish Photos of Air Crash Victims? —The Atlantic

After the crash of yet another Malaysian Airlines jet, the question is being asked: “Is it ethical for news outlets to publish graphic photos of the victims?”.

News outlets, the good ones, spend a lot of time thinking about the best way to present information as it unfolds; part of their thinking should respect the fact that images, once revealed, cannot be unseen.

The Washington Post has a similar article. The Big Picture and TIME have both gone ahead with sharing brutal images (albeit with clear warnings).

 
Jul 18, 2014 · Permalink · Comment

Should Artists Be Different From Inventors When It Comes to Intellectual Property?

United States Patent and Trademark Office

Back in 2012, the Republican Study Committee caused widespread debate over intellectual property law after publishing and then pulling a paper on copyright reform. Derek Khanna, the conservative staffer behind the paper, was fired by the committee shortly afterward.

He may have lost the platform afforded by the RSC, but Khanna is still pushing to have his views on copyright reform heard. His latest writings continue to cause quite a discussion on how copyright should be handled in the United States.
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Copyright Controversy After Appropriated Photo Used to Win Art Contest

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In the two photographs above, the bottom image is a photo-manipulation created using the top image. Are they completely separate works of art? What if we told you the second photo was created without the original photographer’s permission and submitted to a contest as an original artwork? What if we told you it actually won?

That all actually happened last year, and the images are at the center of a copyright skirmish.
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New Service Turns Facebook Photos Into Products Without Your Friend’s Consent

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Want to turn your friend’s Facebook photograph into a mug to sip your morning coffee from? A new service called Photos At My Door can help you do that. It’s an app that can access any of your Facebook friends’ public photographs and turn them into products ranging from photo prints and canvases to mugs and mouse pads.

If the thought of having your photos sold as commercial products without your permission makes you uncomfortable, you’re not alone: the app is attracting criticism for it’s apparently flippant views on photo copyrights.
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Photo of Woman Praying Causes Debate About Photojournalism and Privacy

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NPR sparked a debate regarding photojournalism, ethics, and privacy this past Monday after publishing a story titled, “What It Feels Like To Be Photographed In A Moment Of Grief” on its photography blog.

The discussion revolved around the photograph above, which AFP photographer Emmanuel Dunand captured in the evening after the school shooting in Newtown, Connecticut.
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What’s the Line Between Photograph and Photoshop, Reality and Fantasy?

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Back in 2009, Popular Photography announced the winning photos of its latest Reader’s Photos Contest. Two of the winners (shown above) had some photographers scratching their heads, due to the fact that they’re “Photoshop jobs” rather than non-manipulated stills.
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The New York Times on Why It Published New Impending Death Photo

The New York Post sparked a firestorm of controversy last week after publishing a photo of a man about to be struck by a subway train. People around the world were outraged that a photographer decided to photograph what had occurred, that he had sold (or, in the photographer’s words, licensed) the photo to a newspaper, and that the paper decided to publish it with a sensationalist front page story.

The New York Times found an eerily similar story on its hands this week, but its handling of the situation — and the subsequent public reaction to the article — has been drastically different.
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