Posts Tagged ‘digitize’

American Museum of Natural History Starts Digitizing, Makes 7,000 Photos Available to the Public

American Museum of Natural History exterior at Manhattan Square, 1878

American Museum of Natural History exterior at Manhattan Square, 1878

In an effort to bring 145 years worth of its historic photography collection to the computer age, the American Museum of Natural History has digitized over 7,000 of its archived images and made them publicly available online. Read more…

Neat DIY Projector Rig Lets You Digitize 15 Slides Per Minute Automatically

Not having a dedicated film scanner is no barrier to being able to digitize your slides, but DIY methods we’ve presented in the past tend to be time-consuming. Even if it’s an easy DIY solution that will let you, say, use your desktop all-in-one to scan them in, it’ll still take you a long time to digitize the hundreds of slides you might have lying around.

Well, we’ve finally stumbled across a rig that fixes this problem: All you need is a modified slide projector, a macro lens, and an intervalometer to digitize hundreds of slides in minutes. Read more…

One Man’s Quest to Save a Haunting 5,000-Portrait Archive from the Clutches of Time

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For going on two decades after the end of World War I, Costica Ascinte was quite possibly the only professional photographer in all of Romania. He continued to work right up until his death in 1984, by which point he had accumulated over 5,000 glass plate negatives and several hundred prints — a visual history of the Romanian people and a culture that, we know from previous articles, may soon be gone for good.

Unfortunately, this massive, culturally-rich archive is slowly disappearing as time and improper storage take their toll. But one man, Cezar Popescu, is determined to rescue whatever is still salvageable, and is well on his way to digitizing the entire archive even as it deteriorates before his very eyes. Read more…

Video Offers a Glimpse Into NASA’s Film Digitization Efforts in an Old McDonald’s

In July of last year, we introduced you to the Lunar Orbiter Image Recovery Project (LOIRP), an effort by the NASA Ames Research Center to digitize some 48,000 pounds of 70mm tape shot by the five lunar orbiters that were sent up to photograph the surface of the moon in preparation for the Apollo missions.

We shared a lot of interesting tidbits in that post (which you can find here) but in the video above we get a behind-the-scenes tour led by none other than LOIRP co-founder Dennis Wingo. Read more…

Build a Better Lightbox for Your DIY Film “Scanning” by Stacking Your Glass

ZaDuzoSlow.pl

More and more photographers are attempting to build their own DIY lightboxes these days as they look for ways to easily digitize their film at home using a digital camera. However, a common problem that plagues these lightboxes is vignetting — lighting is uneven and shadows form gradients near the edges of the surface.

Photographer Rafał Nitychoruk of Gdynia, Poland tells us that he has solved the problem with his own custom lightbox. The trick? Make your lightbox short, and stack multiple layers of glass.
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Helmut Turns Your Smartphone Into the World’s Fastest Film Scanner

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Photographer and software developer Kostas Rutkauskas has launched a new mobile app called Helmut. Designed for Android, it’s a film scanning app that lets you digitize your old film strips quickly and on the cheap.
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Modding a Vintage Camera for Digital Use

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My name is David Lo, and I am a street photographer who enjoys taking vintage cameras, digitizing them, and then using them for street photography. This is a walkthrough on my process of modifying a camera.
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Digitizing Your Film Using Your DSLR

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With the cost of my local neg scanner in London being £40/hour for a Hasselblad Flextight, I have been digitising using a DSLR for a quite a while. The results can be extremely good as long as a little time is put into the setup to begin with.
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How to Scan Your Film Using a Digital Camera and Macro Lens

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Yesterday I wrote a post showing the high level of image quality you can achieve by scanning film using a digital camera rather than a film scanner. This post will describe my personal technique for digitizing film using a DSLR and a macro lens.
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Why You Should Digitize Your Film Using a Camera Instead of a Scanner

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If you shoot film and aren’t much into chemicals (or don’t have a basement in which to keep a gigantic 5×7″ enlarger), you’ll soon find yourself needing a way to import those beautiful pictures you’ve taken onto your computer. What? Why didn’t I say, “you’ll need a scanner”? After all, it’s not 1987 anymore — scanners are as common as toaster ovens.

Well, I didn’t say “a scanner” because it’s not the only way you can digitalize those pictures. Indeed, even though it’s the first (and often only) technique most people will think of, it is also the most inefficient and time consuming. And it can lose a lot, I mean a lot, of the quality of the original slide or negative.
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