Posts Tagged ‘digitalcameras’

TopGear’s James May Explains How Digital Cameras Work

I’m a big fan of the UK car show TopGear, but I never thought I’d see the day when the worlds of TopGear and photography would intersect. Fortunately, I have been proven wrong. So sit back and enjoy as TopGear’s Captain Slow James May goes into detail about how digital cameras actually work. Read more…

Of Cameras: ‘Traditional Photography’ is Most Certainly Not Dead

The end of the camera as we know it? I think not.

Jan 14, 2014 · John Carey

Kodak Will Reportedly Soon Join Polaroid in the Mirrorless Camera Market

kodakmirrorless

A week ago, we reported that Kodak had entered into a multi-year agreement with American camera supplier JK Imaging for new lines of Kodak-branded digital cameras. While it’s not uncommon to see this type of deal for low-end cameras, what’s interesting is that the agreement will also result in a Kodak-branded compact system camera. Amateur Photographer writes,

In an interview with Amateur Photographer (AP) at CES on 10 January, Eastman Kodak general manager for Film Capture, Paper and Output Systems, Dennis Olbrich, was asked whether the line-up will include a compact system camera.

Olbrich, who used to work inside Kodak’s camera division, replied: ‘That’s part of the portfolio.’

Polaroid, another beleaguered photo brand, recently signed its own agreement with Sakar International for new Polaroid-branded cameras. That duo is also working on a mirrorless camera system.

Kodak-branded Compact System Camera on Way [Amateur Photographer via Photo Rumors]

Casio QV-10: The First Digital Camera that Offered an LCD Screen and Live View

Did you know that LCD screens and live view didn’t arrive until a number of years after digital cameras hit the market? The first consumer digital camera that featured those technologies was the Casio QV-10 (seen above), which hit store shelves in 1995. However, the screen was purely for framing shots, not for eyeballing exposure, and it took roughly 10 years for live view as we know it to become ubiquitous.

The first prosumer camera to use live view for both exposure control and preview framing was the fixed-lens Canon PowerShot G1 from 2000, although this was still in the line of compact cameras.

The first DSLR to use live view for framing preview only was the fixed-lens Olympus E-10 from 2000. The first interchangeable-lens DSLR to use a live preview was the Fujifilm FinePix S3 Pro, which was launched in October 2004. Its “Live Image” mode could display a live, black-and-white preview of the subject that could be magnified for manual focusing purposes, although the preview was limited to a duration of thirty seconds. [...] The first general-use interchangeable-lens DSLR with live view for framing preview only was the Olympus E-330 of 2006. The first general-use interchangeable-lens DSLRs with live view for both exposure simulated preview and framing preview were the Canon EOS 1Ds Mark III and Canon EOS 40D of 2007.

Just in case you were wondering, the terms “live view” and “live preview” are interchangeable.

Live Preview on Wikipedia (via Casio via NPhoto)

Looking for a New Camera? Buy It In the First Quarter of The Year

If you’re in the market for a new digital camera this year, buying it in January or February might get you the best deal. Lifehacker has published a comprehensive list of when to buy things based on when you’re most likely to see low prices:

January: After the big trade shows like CES come around in mid-January, you’ll see that older model cameras drop in price to prepare for the newly-announced ones.

February: Since the newest cameras will have just come out post-CES, you can grab last year’s models for less.

The Best Time to Buy Anything in 2012 [Lifehacker]


Image credit: February Already!?! by ohdarling

The State of Digital Photography in 2003

Here’s a fun blast from the not-so-distant past: the video above is a short clip from the TV show “Call For Help” that originally aired back in September 2003. In it, tech broadcaster Leo Laporte chats with digital photography pioneer Mikkel Aaland — who, by the way, was introduced to digital cameras by Ansel Adams — about the evolution of digital cameras up to that point. It’s an interesting glimpse into a time when the Nikon D100 was the state of the art.

(via SnapBlog)

CNBC: Point-and-Shoot Cameras Are an Endangered Species

CNBC ran this short segment a couple days ago in which they invited CNET’s Dan Ackerman to explain the changing landscape in the digital camera industry. He thinks point-and-shoot cameras may soon become extinct due to the rise of camera-equipped phones, but also that DSLRs are the cameras here to stay. A recent study found that phones have replaced digital cameras completely for 44% of consumers, and that number seems bound to rise as the cameras on phones continue to improve.

My guess is that in five years, we’ll see digital camera users divided into three camps: mobile phone, interchangeable lens compact, and DSLR. What’s your prediction?

Nikon and Sony Gaining on Canon in Worldwide Digital Camera Market

Market research firm IDC released its findings about the worldwide digital camera market recently, with interesting details about the current market shares of camera manufacturers. From 2009 to 2010, Canon’s share remained perfectly constant at 19%, while #2 player Sony increased its share from 16.9% to 17.9%. Nikon also grew from 11.1% to 12.6%. The worldwide market for digital cameras is also growing — last year it increased 10% to 141 million cameras sold.
Read more…

Ed Helms Introduces Digital Cameras on The Daily Show

Here’s a fun blast from the past: in the early 2000s The Daily Show ran this short segment in which Ed Helms (now known for playing Andy Bernard on The Office) introduces viewers to digital cameras. It’s an interesting glimpse at how some people felt about the emergence of digital photography as it was starting to become popular.

Keep your eye out for old-school Photoshop!


Thanks for the tip, @davevogler!