Posts Tagged ‘diagram’

Incredibly Detailed Diagram Shows an Exploded View of Nikon’s Iconic F3 Camera

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Bellamy Hunt of Japan Camera Hunter recently shared an awesome camera poster with the world that definitely bears sharing with as many photography lovers as possible.

The poster shows an exploded diagram of every single component that went into making Nikon’s iconic F3P 35mm camera. Said to be a reference diagram that a repair shop would use while working on the old camera, the full diagram is mesmerizingly vast and shows where every screw, dial and knob is placed.

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Lighting Diagram Creator Lets You Easily Save and Share Your Light Setups Online

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The Online Lighting Diagram Creator is a web app for easily creating and sharing lighting diagrams. It was created back in 2009 by Sydney-based photographer and web developer Quoc Huy Nguyen Dinh. It’s an extremely simple tool through which you can create detailed diagrams by simply clicking and dragging.
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A Look Inside Lytro’s Light Field Camera

Lytro‘s groundbreaking light field camera is finally landing in the hands of customers, and to give people a better idea of how the camera works, the New York Times has published an interesting diagram that shows what makes the camera tick. Here’s what DPreview has to say about the camera:

The Lytro LFC is so unlike any conventional camera that it doesn’t make sense to score it in comparison to them. Ultimately, though, we’re not convinced that the Lytro either solves any existing problem or presents any compelling raison d’etre of its own. If it were higher resolution or allowed greater separation or could produce single lens 3D video it might generate a lot more excitement. As it is, it feels like a product arriving before the underlying technology is really ready.

All of which is a great shame, because Lytro has done a great job of making a credible consumer product out of a piece of fairly abstract scientific research. It’s quite possible that in the hands of the right people it will result in some interesting creations but we just don’t yet see it as a mass-market device.

The New York Times came to the same conclusion — that the technology is revolutionary, but the product isn’t game-changing… yet.

A Review of the Lytro Camera (via Photojojo)

Nokia’s 41-Megapixel Camera Phone Sensor Compared to Other Sensors

Here’s a great diagram by Mobot that shows how the 41-megapixel sensor inside Nokia’s new 808 PureView phone stacks up against other popular sensor sizes. It’s pretty clear that they didn’t just milk a small sensor for more megapixels as a simply marketing ploy, but instead came up with a sensor that’s significantly larger than those found in other smartphones. Engadget also has a photo showing a comparison of sensor sizes, while Digital Trends has published an article on five reasons why the 41-megapixels isn’t a gimmick.

(via Mobot via PhotographyBLOG)

The Size of Lytro’s Sensor Compared with Other Common Formats

Devin Coldewey of TechCrunch created this helpful diagram showing the relative sizes of various sensors, including the one found inside the Lytro light field camera (a camera that lets you focus after shots are taken). The FCC published photos of the Lytro camera’s guts last week, revealing that the sensor inside is roughly 6.5×4.5mm (smaller than our previous estimate). This means that it’s slightly larger than the iPhone sensor and slightly smaller than the one in most point-and-shoot cameras.

Another interesting finding is that the chip inside supports Bluetooth and Wi-Fi. The company says that they’re working on wireless connectivity, but doesn’t have it enabled in the initial Lytro camera.

Lytro Teardown Shows Potential Wireless Capability, Smallish Sensor [TechCrunch]

Diagram: The Effect Of Using Different Lenses on a Crop Frame Sensor

Here’s a diagram created by Reddit user GeneralSarsby that shows the effective field of view of lenses of various focal lengths when used on a 1.6x crop factor sensor. You can also download the source svg if you want to edit or build upon it.


Image credit: Diagram by GeneralSarsby and used with permission

Lighting Diagram: Another Free Lighting Diagram Web App

Just launched this week, Lighting Diagram is another simple web-based tool that lets photographers create and share lighting diagrams and the photos created with the setups.

Lighting Diagram (via PhotographyBLOG)

Why You Should Shoot Photos in RAW

Shooting in JPG mode is convenient because you instantly have a file you can throw onto the Internet, but if you’re serious about photography, you might want to think about shooting in RAW if you aren’t already. The reason is that only shooting JPG is the equivalent of letting the camera make a print for you and then tossing the negative — something film photographers would never do. Here’s a simple diagram by Haje Jan Kamps and Reddit user jannne to help you understand the differences.

HDR Photography Explained in a Diagram

Reddit user MacTuitui created this simple diagram (click to enlarge) explaining the idea behind HDR photography. The first low dynamic range (LDR) taken normally with a camera isn’t able to capture much of the detail found in the highlight and shadow areas of the scene. Two (or more) photographs are then taken at different exposure values to capture a wider range (the bracketing step) and subsequently combined into a single image with a high dynamic range (HDR). Since most displays aren’t capable of displaying this full range, the image needs to be tone mapped to have its appearance approximated on LDR screens.

Sylights Launches Nifty New Lighting Diagram Web App

Sylights (short for “Share Your Lights”) is a new website that makes it easy for you to create and share lighting diagrams.

Created by Paris-based photographers Pierre-Jean Quilleré and Olivier Lance, the service is quite minimalistic, with the main pages being a diagram editor and a browse section to check out other photographers’ diagrams. Here’s an example diagram created on the service:

The site is designed quite well, and the editor is actually easy and fun to use. You simply right-click to add elements to the canvas, and then drag, resize, and rotate them as needed. The editor uses HTML5 and CSS3, so it should work fine on devices made by companies run by CEOs who hate Flash.

If you want to try out the editor, we made a test account so you don’t have to create a new one. Use the email address “[email protected]” and the password “password”.

Sylights (via DIYPhotography)


Update: Turns out you actually don’t need an account to create or browse diagrams. Oops. You can use the test account we made to… see what it’s like to have an account?