Posts Tagged ‘device’

3D Video Camcorder Appears for Those Who Can’t Wait

A couple days ago we reported that the upcoming Nintendo 3DS will have a built-in 3D camera system, instantly putting 3D photography into the hands of those lined up to buy the system.

If you can’t wait for the DS to play around with 3D photography and instant feedback on a 3D screen, Hammacher Schlemmer has unveiled a 3D camcorder with virtually the same imaging specs as the 3DS. The device, which ships on July 2, also shoots and records at 640×480 (VGA) resolution and has a special 3D screen that allows you to review your photographs in 3D on a screen that doesn’t require special glasses.

Unlike the 3DS, however, this 3D camcorder has a 7 inch screen, almost double the 3.53 inch screen of the 3Ds.

The downside for this device is the price — it’s listed at $600, which is much more than most people think the 3DS will be sold for.

Unless you’re desperate to get your hands on this technology, it might be prudent to wait a year or two. Presumably 3D cameras and camcorders will be capturing at much better resolutions by then (unless you’re willing to pay around $21,000, of course).

(via Wired)

BeetleCam Shoots African Wildlife Up Close

The BeetleCam is a remote controlled car that has a Canon 400D DSLR and two flash units strapped to the top. It’s the brainchild of brothers Will & Matt Burrard-Lucas, award-winning wildlife photographers based in the UK, and allows them to capture some unique photographs of some of Africa’s most dangerous animals.

William tells us,

We are brothers from the UK specialising in wildlife photography. We aim to use teamwork and ingenuity to take unusual shots of wild animals. Recently we embarked on a project to photograph African wildlife from a ground level perspective using a camera mounted on top of a four-wheel drive remote control buggy called BeetleCam. We took BeetleCam to Tanzania and photographed lions, elephants and buffalo with it. The project proved to be a great success and we managed to get some amazing photographs from a unique perspective.

For more photographs from the BeetleCam, and some videos of the cam in action, check out the BeetleCam project page.


Image credits: Photographs by Will & Matt Burrard-Lucas and used with permission

Stabilize Your Camera with Some PVC Pipe

When Instructables member bertus52x11 had his cast removed after breaking his arm, he found that his arm was too weak to handle his DSLR camera. Realizing that those less fortunate might have similar problems with handling heavy equipment, he created a do-it-yourself camera support using PVC pipe that transfers the weight of your camera to your chest.

In addition to allowing people to more easily handle heavy cameras, the chest support also acts as a stabilizer, reducing camera shake in situations where you don’t have a tripod. He writes,

This device can help people with a weak arm or hand, but it can be helpful to people with Parkinson to stabilise the camera. Naturally it can be used for stabilising pocket cameras as well. You can then slim down the design by using smaller (copper) tubing. Once you have chosen for copper, a Steampunk design is never far away. I would like to see that!

If you’re interested in creating such a support for yourself or someone you know, check out the easy-to-follow tutorial on Instructables:

Supporting a dSLR camera on your chest (via Lifehacker)

Taking Photos with Hand Gestures

SixthSense is a wearable gesture device being developed by PhD student Pranav Mistry at the MIT Media Lab that allows the wearer to interact with their environment, treating the real world as a computer display. The above video is of the demo that was given at TED that generated international attention. What we found interesting is how the device allows you to photograph with hand gestures (at 6m25s), and the ability to work with your images on any wall.

Perhaps in the near future we’ll be able to edit and send our photographs on a wall immediately after shooting them using a wearable projector.

Photosimile: An Office Machine for Product Photography

photosimile

At CES 2010 next year, photography automation company Ortery will unveil the Photosimile 5000, a device that they claim is the “next generation imaging device for the office.” Essentially it’s like a copier, except for stock/product photography. You can simply walk up to the machine, place what you’d like to photograph inside, adjust a few settings on the parameter, and walk away with a professional looking product photograph. The computer-operated system automatically adjusts lighting to remove shadows, and takes care of handling white balance.

This isn’t exactly news for photographers, but it’s interesting to see the landscape of what’s out there and what’s to come.

(via The Imaging Resource)

Charge Your Camera by Hand with YoGen

yogenlogoIf for some reason you’re against carrying extra batteries around for your digital camera, then this might be just the gadget for you. YoGen is a human powered charger that generates power when you pull on the lawnmower-style ripcord.

It will officially be launched at the 2010 Consumer Electronics Show, but you can already place orders for the $40 device on their website.

The YoGen charger comes in two styles: clear and black. Here’s what the clear charger looks like in action:

yogencharger

In addition to digital cameras, the charger is meant for anything from iPods to cell phones. The power is supposedly comparable to standard AC adapters, which also means it’s primary use isn’t in charging your gadgets back up to full power by hand (since that would take forever), but rather to give your device an extra spurt of power when you need it.

The Yogen website also has a couple videos showing how the thing is used. This one features an absent minded-man who constant talks to himself and fishes for dead/plastic fish. Enjoy!

Yogen (via PhotographyBLOG)