Posts Tagged ‘developing’

I Had 164 Rolls of Film Processed at Once: Here’s How I Do It

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I recently stopped into the Costco in Mountain View, California with 164 rolls of Kodak Portra 400. You should’ve seen the look of the staff — it was a look of confusion, awe, and amazement.

They were surprised that all that film I brought in was all shot by me. They were also partly worried that they would have to process all of it. I reassured them by telling them to take their time. I wasn’t in a rush. After all, I had been sitting on my film and letting them “marinate” for nearly a full year.
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How The Rescued Film Project Processes C-41 Color Film at Home

Photographer Levi Bettweiser of the Rescued Film Project regularly processes large batches of old films of different styles and eras. Earlier this year he received quite a bit of attention after finding, processing, and sharing 31 rolls of undeveloped film from World War II.

Bettweiser recently spent 14 hours processing a batch of C-41 color film at home. The 10-minute video above is a walkthrough on his technique and workflow. With processing labs getting more expensive and disappearing, this could be of interest to you if you’ve ever considered developing C-41 film yourself.

(via Rescued Film Project via ISO 1200)

Darkroom Gear Recycled Into Chic Table Lamp

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You, of course, are an analog purist who will forever be devoted to film. Other folks, however, may be wondering what they’re going to do with a bunch of darkroom equipment that’s getting lonelier by the year. Read more…

Toy Camera Photographs Developed with Everything From Juice to Medicine

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Ever wonder what resulting photos would look like if you developed film with various liquids found around the house? Photographer Matthew Cetta does too, and he’s actually spent quite some time finding out. Cetta has been doing experiments through a project called “Photogenic Alchemy,” creating toy camera photos with wild aesthetics by developing the films with all kinds of random things — everything from lemon juice to Pepto Bismol.
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Nikon SDK C# Wrapper Library Lets You Control Your DSLR from Your Computer

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Nikon released software development kits (SDKs) for its SLRs some time ago, allowing for developers to create software that play nice with Nikon cameras. Using the company’s DSLR SDKs, savvy programmers can develop software that controls camera functions such as aperture, shutter speed and even shutter release.

Unfortunately, Nikon’s SDKs are notoriously difficult to work with. But if you’re just dying to control your SLR from your computer, SourceForge user Thomas Dideriksen has kindly done the heavy lifting for you by putting together an open source C# wrapper library that allows you to do just that.
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A Behind-the-Scenes Look At How 35mm Film is Developed and Printed at a Lab

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If you have your 35mm film processed and printed at your local lab, have you ever wondered how it’s done? In this post, I’ll take you on a behind-the-scenes tour on the entire process.
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How to Process Your C-41 Film at Home

After almost two years of shooting film nonstop and more than $1,000 worth of expenses on processing and prints, I needed to reconsider my budget and find a way of being able to shoot more and pay less. I thus began to process my C-41 rolls at home. It’s extremely easy to do and I‘ll show you today how to do it, step by step.
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Shooting Kodachrome Film in 2012

Like everyone else who heard that Kodak was discontinuing Kodachrome in 2009 — and that Dwayne’s Photo would not develop the slide film after 2010 — I shot as much Kodachrome film as I could acquire, before that “last developing day” deadline.
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How To Develop Photo Paper With Your Favorite Vintage of Merlot

Around this time last year, we featured a video on developing film using coffee and vitamin C. And now, the folks behind the Caffenol blog (which was named after the nickname given to the “home brew” developer) have put together a video showing that it’s possible to do something similar using red wine instead of coffee and photo paper instead of film. Read more…

How to Have Your 120 Film Developed at Walmart for $3 a Roll

Update: We’re hearing that Walmart is no longer offering medium format film development.


Want to try your hand at shooting medium format 120 film but not sure where you’d get it developed? Stacie Grissom of Stars for Streetlights recommends WalMart as an easy and affordable option:

I have an awesome tip for you. I actually got my Holga prints developed through Walmart for about $3 per roll. That’s it. I could not believe it. Here’s what you need to do:

For each roll of film, take a separate film envelope and write “SEND OUT ONLY” at the top. Then fill in your info. “Send Out Only” means that Walmart will send it to a photo lab to be developed instead of developing it in the store. I don’t know how many (if any) Walmarts still develop 35mm film, but they definitely won’t do 120 film. Just send it out to a lab that knows what to do. Next, in the special instructions section, make sure you write “120 Film Processing, 4×4 prints.” And then drop them in the box! It’s seriously that simple. I was really paranoid when I sent out my film, but Walmart actually did a nice job.

Grissom also offers a number of other tips for shooting with Holga cameras.

7 Tips for Holga Cameras [Stars for Streetlights]