Posts Tagged ‘designs’

Designer Creates “Touchband” Interface to Make Cameras More Usable

Designer Miha Feuš doesn’t think the user interfaces on low-end compact cameras are very useable for the average consumer, so earlier this year he set out to create a better camera interface. After a good amount of thinking, building, and testing, Feuš made this video to share his ideas, show off his prototype, and report on his results.

His design revolves around a “touchband”, which is a one-dimensional touch sensitive area positioned next to the screen. According to his user tests, the touchband is easier to use than both traditional button interfaces and newer touchscreen interfaces. Who knows, maybe one day we’ll know Feuš as the Jakob Nielsen of the camera world.

Creative Minimalist Business Card Design

Developer Boris Smus came up with this super minimalist way of sharing his email address, Twitter username, and website URL. He writes,

I’m ordering a personal set of moo mini cards. These are small, two sided prints. One side contains an image, and the other contains contact information. On the image side, I’m putting snippets of travel photography. The other side is by default a conventional list of contact information, but moo conveniently allows it to be replaced by a custom image.

If you have an email address that lets you do the same thing, this could be a neat way to pass your contact info to prospective clients.

Minimal Business Card Design (via kottke.org)

The Ancestors of Modern Camera Lenses

Rather than being built from scratch with new designs, new camera lenses are designed by taking existing lens designs that work well and then improving on them. As a result, virtually every lens design can be traced back to one of six basic lens designs developed in the early 1900s (shown above). Roger Cicala of LensRentals writes,

Those original lenses in their pure form each had strengths and weaknesses. Modern lenses derived from them have ‘inherited’ those same underlying tendencies. Many of the complex technologies used in a modern lens are put there to correct the underlying problems of the original design.

Head on over to his post to learn about lenses derived from the first three of these designs.

Lens Genealogy Part 1 [Lens Rentals]

MMI Concept Camera Uses a Smartphone As Its LCD Screen

The WVIL concept camera that made the rounds on the Internet featured a lens that could operate separately from the camera body, but Or Leviteh‘s MMI camera is even simpler: it’s a small screen-less camera that uses a smartphone as its “camera body”.

MMI enables you to see what the camera sees on your [smartphone] screen, to adjust the settings as needed, and to see the results without getting up and even to upload the pictures online. From the application you can control all settings: white balance, focus, picture burst, timer and even tilt the camera lens, all without having to reach the camera.

Separating the lens and sensor components of a camera from its LCD screen and controls seems to be a pretty popular idea as of late (Nikon even showed off a similar concept camera recently).

MMI cam (via TrendHunter)

Nikon Shows Off Some Funky Concept Camera Designs

At the Hello Demain (Hello Tomorrow) exhibition in Paris, France this year, Nikon showed off a number of strange looking concept camera designs. While it’s pretty unlikely they’re actually planning to release any of these designs, it’s interesting to see what they would come up with for this kind of exhibition.
Read more…

Strange Prototype Cameras by Samsung

Samsung just published a followup to the NX lens engineer interview video that we shared a couple weeks ago featuring Q&As with the planners, marketers, and designers behind the lenses. Included on the page was this interesting photograph that appears to show a bunch of prototype cameras developed in the company. Check out the cube-shaped camera and another one with three retro dials at the top!

How the NX Lenses are launched into the World (via Photo Rumors)

Concept Design for a Leica E-System DSLR Camera

Elizabeth Clark, an industrial design student at the California College of the Arts, was given the assignment of designing a camera in one of her classes, and came up with this Leica “E-System” DSLR. Her goal was to develop a product that breaks free from traditional SLR designs and appeals to multiple generations of photographers. An interesting aspect of the camera is that the materials used for the exterior include warm leather and wood accents… A wooden DSLR — now that would be something!

You can find an in-depth look at the design on Clark’s website.

Leica E-System (via KEH Camera Blog)


Image credits: Photographs by Elizabeth Clark and used with permission