Posts Tagged ‘design’

Camera Brands with Split Personalities

Logo designer Graham Smith has a neat project called “Brand Reversions” in which the logo styles of famous companies are swapped with their competitors. Canon and Nikon swap styles in the logos above, while Leica’s famous red dot takes on Panasonic’s Lumix brand name. Check out the rest on Smith’s website.

Brand Reversions (via My Modern Met via Laughing Squid)

How Elephants Take Self-Portraits

Lonely Traveller” is a new photography-related t-shirt for sale over on Threadless. Basically, elephants have nature’s version of the XShot Camera Extender.

Lonely Traveller (via Photojojo)

Designer Behind the Kodak Baby Brownie Honored in US Stamp

The USPS has unveiled a new set of stamps called “Pioneers of American Industrial Design” that honors 12 of the most influential American industrial designers of the 20th century, and one of them is Walter Dorwin Teague:

Known as the “dean of industrial design,” Walter Dorwin Teague believed that good artistic design fit both form and function into a single aesthetic package. During his career-long collaboration with Eastman Kodak Company, he designed several popular cameras, including the 1934 “Baby Brownie” (shown on the stamp). [#]

Besides designing cameras for Kodak for 30 years, Teague also worked for the likes of Boeing and Texaco, becoming one of the most prolific industrial designers in US history.

Pioneers of American Industrial Design (via Popular Photography)

Animation Showing How the Canon 10D and 24-85mm Lens are Assembled

This animation was created by students of the Engineering 128: Advanced Engineering Design Graphics course at UC Berkeley during the Spring 2008 semester. The first part shows a Canon 10D DSLR exploding into its individual parts, and then those parts coming together again to slowly rebuild the camera, while the second part does the same for a Canon 24-85mm lens. Pretty dang impressive considering that it’s for an undergraduate course.

Business Card with Nifty Built-in Aperture Mechanism

Bryce Bell of cardnetics created this business card design that features a built-in aperture mechanism. Pull the lever down and the aperture opens up. If you run a photography-related business, this could be a neat business card to pass out to your clients. Pre-assembled cards start at $6 each, while you can buy kits that you put together yourself for $2.50. If you want to try printing and laser cutting the card yourself, the design templates are available here.

Small Iris (via Reddit)

A Camera Study by Mari Sheibley

Here’s a beautiful illustration titled “A Camera Study” by Mari Sheibley, the lead designer over at Foursquare and the person behind the badges. I think this would be awesome as a poster.

A Camera Study (via Laughing Squid)

Make Your Wall Magnetic for an Awesome Way to Show Off Photos

Did you know that you can turn any wall magnetic by painting it with magnetic primer? Communications company M Booth did this with one of its walls, then sent out employees onto the streets of NYC with Fujifilm Instax cameras. The result is this impressive wall displaying 800 instant photos!
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Flickr Designer Writes Blog Post Publicly Criticizing the Site’s Usability

There have been a number of stories lately reporting that a large number of Flickr users are leaving the site for new photo-sharing services that are cropping up, including Instagram and 500px. Earlier his week, a designer at Flickr named Timoni West wrote a post on her blog that publicly criticized Flickr’s usability. More specifically, she calls the “Your contacts” page (the one that shows your contacts’ photos) the “most important page on Flickr”, pointing out the problems with the page and offering redesign ideas that would address them.
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Canon EOS-0: All the Bells and Whistles You Never Wanted to See on a DSLR

The Canon EOS-0 is what you get at the Apocalypse when all the major camera, software, and operating system companies get together to unleash unspeakable evil into the world. It’s a camera with a little bit of everything: support for every major lens mount, a drive for various kinds of discs, Windows Vista as the operating system (shudder), Photoshop available on the giant widescreen LCD, etc… Pretty much the only thing you won’t find on this camera is a toaster.
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Are Cameras Designed to Age Gracefully?

design mind has an interesting post titled “Aged to Perfection” that explores the issue of whether or not consumer gadgets age gracefully as time and use wear them down. They specifically compare a 3-year-old iPhone with a 7-year-old Canon compact film camera:

The camera’s emulated metallic finish is only surface-deep and its wear tends to emphasizes awkward artifacts of the injection molding process used to create it. At this point the Canon camera’s shell looks like garbage while the iPhone’s is starting to resemble something more like an heirloom pocket watch.

They also make the point that a product’s original “new” look normally only lasts a brief amount of time, while the user is forced to live with the “aged” look as the product decays. It would be interesting to see how modern cameras compare in terms of their “aged” look rather than what they look like out of the box. Have your cameras aged well?

Aged to Perfection (via Wired)


Image credit: Photographs by Remy Labesque of design mind