Posts Tagged ‘decisivemoment’

Photographer Uses Light and Shadows to Frame Human Forms in the City

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Want to see some beautiful street photographs that make use of light and shadows? Look no further than the project “Man on Earth” by London-based photographer Rupert Vandervell. Each image in the series shows a single person’s figure framed by the shadows and features of a big city.
Read more…

The Decisive Moment is Dead. Long Live the Constant Moment

decisvemoment

We photographers deal in things which are continually vanishing, and when they have vanished there is no contrivance on earth which can make them come back again. We cannot develop and print a memory.
Henri Cartier-Bresson

We exist on a treadmill of forgetting and anticipating. We labor to preserve what we treasure of our past, even while the present shotguns us with a thousand new options, one of which must become our future. One of which we must choose.

In this maelstrom of time it is hard to be calm; to understand what warrants attention, and what can be ignored. This state of tranquility and presence has been the essence of the modern photographic act, best characterized in the popular mind by Cartier-Bresson’s concept of the “Decisive Moment.”
Read more…

Henri Cartier-Bresson on “The Decisive Moment”

Here’s what Henri Cartier-Bresson, the father of modern photojournalism, said about his concept of “The Decisive Moment” in an interview with The Washington Post in 1957:

Photography is not like painting. There is a creative fraction of a second when you are taking a picture. Your eye must see a composition or an expression that life itself offers you, and you must know with intuition when to click the camera.

That is the moment the photographer is creative. Oop! The Moment! Once you miss it, it is gone forever. [#]

The phrase was taken from a quote by the 17th century Cardinal de Retz, who stated, “There is nothing in this world that does not have a decisive moment.”


Image credit: A bit later after “the decisive moment” by AlexRK

A Glimpse Behind the Gare St. Lazare in Google Street View

If you go to Google Street View and type in “rue de londres, paris“, you can visit the location where photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson captured his famous street photograph Behind the Gare St. Lazare in 1932. It’s an ordinary location that became an iconic photograph through Cartier-Bresson’s “decisive moment” style of photography. Cartier-Bresson notes,

There was a plank fence around some repairs behind the Gare Saint Lazare train station. I happened to be peeking through a gap in the fence with my camera at the moment the man jumped. The space between the planks was not entirely wide enough for my lens, which is the reason why the picture is cut off on the left.

If you know of any other iconic photo locations that can be revisited through Google Street View, leave a comment!

rue de londres, paris” in Google Maps (via Erik Kim)

Oldest Known Print of Iconic Cartier-Bresson Photo to Be Auctioned

Behind the Gare St. Lazare is one of French photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson‘s best known photographs, and is frequently cited as an example of his “decisive moment” approach to photography. The photograph was made in 1932, but the oldest known print is dated 1946. That print will be sold at a Christie’s auction on November 11th along with 100 other signed prints, and is expected to fetch up to ~$250,000.

(via Christies via Foto Actualidad)