Posts Tagged ‘dday’

TIME Addresses the Fake Ruined Negatives from the Robert Capa D-Day Documentary

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A month ago we shared with you a video documenting the story behind the ‘lost’ negatives famed conflict photographer Robert Capa captured on D-Day.

In the documentary, there’s a moment where the empty rolls of film are shown, emulsion gone and the plastic worn and tattered. Many of us probably didn’t think twice about the negatives that were shown, but A.D. Coleman and Rob McElroy did, and what they found out was a bit shocking, especially coming from a publication as respected as TIME. Read more…

The Last of The Liberators: D-Day Veterans Photographed in the Locations where They Fought

It might be a few days after the 70th anniversary of the D-Day Invasions of Normandy, but in no way does the belated delivery of this powerful photo series diminish its impact.

Photographed by Robin Savage, The Last of The Liberators is a collection of portraits of the last British D-Day veterans. But what makes these portraits special isn’t just the people photographed, but they places they were photographed in. Read more…

Tony Vaccaro Shares His Story and Images from D-Day and the Weeks that Followed

On this, the 70th anniversary of the D-Day invasion of Normandy, it seemed appropriate that we cap off the day and the week with the story and images of a remarkable photographer who was there: US Army Private Tony Vaccaro. Read more…

Adobe Image Deblurring Done on Capa’s Famous D-Day Photo

Update: We’ve removed this image to avoid fringing on the copyright held by Magnum Photos. Click the image below to see the original side-by-side comparison.


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Still think Adobe’s Image Deblurring technology is fake? Check out this before-and-after comparison showing what the feature does to one of the most famous camera-shake photos in history: Robert Capa’s D-Day photograph of an American soldier landing on Omaha Beach.
Read more…

Three and a Half Rolls of Melted History

On June 6, 1944 — also known as D-Day — war photographer Robert Capa braved the defenses of the heavily fortified Omaha beach, swimming ashore with the second wave of soldiers. Using two Contax II cameras, a 50mm lens, and several rolls of film, he managed to capture 106 photographs documenting the first couple hours of the now-famous invasion (Omaha beach is the one seen in the opening scenes of Saving Private Ryan). After he raced back to London to have the film processed, a Life magazine darkroom technician make a tragic mistake: the dryer was set too high and the emulsion on three and a half of the rolls melted, completely erasing 95 of the 106 photos. The 11 remaining images were all published and became Capa’s most famous work.

If you ever accidentally nuke some photos, whether film or digital, just remember Capa’s three and a half rolls of melted history and you might not feel so bad about your lost images.

The Magnificent Eleven: The D-Day Photographs of Robert Capa [Skylighters]