Posts Tagged ‘damaged’

What a Canon Rebel XT DSLR Looks Like After 3 Years in a Muddy Creek

Earlier this month, we shared the crazy story of a DSLR that sat at the bottom of a creek for three years before being returned to its owner, thanks to the fact that the memory card was still readable. In case you were wondering what the camera looked like after chillin’ in such an unfriendly environment, here are some photographs of it sent to us by owner Michael Comeau.
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Beware: Light Painting with Steel Wool Can Be Hazardous to Your Lens’ Health

The beautiful light painting photo you see here was created using steel wool (here’s a tutorial on the technique). Basically, you fix some steel wool on the end of a rope, set it on fire by rubbing a 9V battery against it, and then swing it around to fling sparks all over the place. While it’s becoming a pretty common photo project, it can also be hazardous to your lens’ — and your body’s — health. Jon Beard, the photographer behind this photo, learned the hard way. See that thick yellow line in the upper right hand corner? That’s one of the bits of burning metal striking his $2,000 Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8G lens.
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Use a Shoe to Remove Stuck Lens Filters

Here’s a quick tip for if you ever have a hard time removing a lens filter from a lens (e.g. when it’s damaged): use a shoe. Simply take any shoe with a grippy flat bottom, press it firmly against the filter, and then turn it. It’s a super simple technique that should work every time unless the threads on the lens itself are badly damaged.


Thanks for the tip, Luke!

Nikon and Sony DSLR Production May Be Delayed for Months Due to Thai Floods

A week ago we shared a photo showing Nikon’s factory in Thailand submerged due to the catastrophic flooding happening there. The latest news is that both Nikon and Sony have had their camera factories severely damaged, which may have cause delays of at least 1-2 months. 90% of Nikon’s SLR cameras — the low to mid-range ones — are produced at the company’s Thailand plant, while 100% of Sony DSLRs are made at its now-damaged factory.

Nikon was expected to announce a new DSLR by the end of this year, but it seems like that may be postponed indefinitely at this point. Sony’s new NEX-7 and A65 cameras have been pulled from Amazon due to “manufacturing concerns”.

(via The Nation via 43 Rumors)

Canon 5D Mark II Has Sensor Destroyed by Concert Lasers

Here’s yet another painful-to-watch example of what the powerful lasers used at concerts can do to your camera’s sensor. This poor soul brought their Canon 5D Mark II to capture some footage, and left with the camera having a new feature: white “framing lines”! Too bad they can’t be turned off…

Unlike gamma rays when sitting in an airplane, concert lasers are definitely something you need to protect your camera from.

(via ALTFoto)

How Dust and Damage on Lenses Affect Image Quality

This photograph was taken by a lens with some “obstruction” on the front element. Aside from the blurry patch of nastiness in the bottom portion of the frame, the rest of the image looks pretty decent. What do you think the “obstruction” is? A little dirt? A smudge where the photographer accidentally touched the front element? A scratch? The answer is a little closer to a scratch than a smudge…
Click here to see the answer

Why Wedding Photographers Should Be Aware of Their Surroundings

This poor wedding photographer wasn’t looking at where he was going and, as a result, caused a huge commotion and likely ruined his pricey gear. On the plus side, he’s probably learned to make note of his surroundings for the rest of his life. Hopefully the photographs survived.

(via DigitalRev)

Salvaging Water-Damaged Photos

Do you know what to do if one of your prints gets damaged by water? If you living in a flood prone area (or are clumsy), it’d be good to know.

The Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) has an informative technical bulletin titled “Salvaging Photographs”, that provides a rundown on the response you should take to water damage.

One of the interesting tips is to freeze your prints to prevent further damage:

Freezing to help retard further deterioration by water or mold may be necessary if the materials cannot be treated immediately. Storage at low temperatures buys time in which to safely plan and organize the many steps needed to dry the affected materials and to prepare a rehabilitation site.

Vacuum freeze-drying can help you recover the prints:

In this method, photographic materials—either wet or frozen—are placed in a vacuum chamber. As the vacuum is pulled, a low heat source is introduced and the photographs are carefully dried at temperatures below freezing.

Some additional tips from the document:

  • Keep immersion time to an absolute minimum
  • Treat least stable items (i.e. prints rather than negatives) first
  • Keep identifying information near the prints
  • Never let the prints dry in contact with any surface, since it may stick permanently

If there’s any chance you might have to deal with recovering wet prints, this PDF would be a good thing to bookmark, save, or print out.

(via Lifehacker)


Image credit: Flood series by cikaga jamie