Posts Tagged ‘damage’

Storm Chasing Photographer Captures the Terrible Damage Done by Insane Hail Storm

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One week ago today, on June 3rd, a massive storm rolled through Nebraska where storm chasing photographer Mike Hollingshead — whose work we’ve feature before on PetaPixel — was prepared to chase down some likely tornadoes.

He didn’t end up finding or chasing any tornadoes, but a storm he chose to leave behind earlier in the day in order to pursue his main target ended up turning into an incredibly powerful hail and wind storm, and doing some hard-to-believe damage to Hollingshead’s own home town. He, of course, documented it all with his camera the next day. Read more…

5 Great Ways to Destroy Your Camera

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Many of us know that feeling. That gut punch of shock and denial as we watch our camera fall from our grip or swing to the earth from an unsecured tripod. We’ve watched as it impacted with the ground with a hard thud or bounced amongst the rocks collecting more damage with every tumble as it travels farther away from the safety of your hands.
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Pro Tip: Never Ask a Professional Golfer to ‘Aim for the Camera’

Back in the mid 2000s, when Tiger Woods was the number two player in the world (and about to embark on a 281-week number one run such as has never been seen again), he was part of a Nike commercial shot by director Frank Todaro. In a fit of inspiration, Todaro asked Woods to “go ahead and aim for the camera” — and much to the camera’s disappointment, Woods did. Read more…

Dropping Your DSLR Down a Mountain Can Be Bad for Its Health

One of the questions that comes back most often when people learn what I do for a living is: how do you manage not to drop your camera? Up until Saturday, I could (somewhat smugly) answer that I am being very careful and have been lucky so far.
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Nikon D800 Announcement Reportedly Called Off Due to Thai Floods

Japanese camera site digicame-info is reporting that an upcoming announcement of a D700 successor (possibly the D800) has been cancelled due to the ongoing flooding in Thailand, and that Nikon’s product supply has nearly come to a standstill — affecting existing products in addition to upcoming ones. Even if the D800 is being manufactured in Japan like the D700 is, some components may be produced in Nikon’s flood-damaged factory.

(via digicame-info via Foto Actualidad)

Nikon DSLR Factory Hit by Thailand’s Worst Floods in 50 Years

Thailand is experiencing the worst flooding it has seen in more than 50 years, and Nikon is also getting hit hard. A statement released by the company today (and photos emerging from the area) reveals that the company’s entry-level DSLR factory there is now swamped with water:

The 1st floor of all buildings at the premises are presently submerged. Details of the damages are now under investigation. [...] We are continuing to investigate details of the damage, but are unable to predict how soon operation will be resumed. We will set up our recovery support system and endeavor to restart its operation as early as possible.

This may lead to a shortage in supply and an increase in prices — the same thing we saw after the massive earthquake and tsunami in Japan earlier this year.

Notice on the damage from the flood in Thailand (via Nikon Rumors)


Image credit: Photograph by Noppatjak Attanon and used with permission

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Canon 5D Mark II Has Sensor Destroyed by Concert Lasers

Here’s yet another painful-to-watch example of what the powerful lasers used at concerts can do to your camera’s sensor. This poor soul brought their Canon 5D Mark II to capture some footage, and left with the camera having a new feature: white “framing lines”! Too bad they can’t be turned off…

Unlike gamma rays when sitting in an airplane, concert lasers are definitely something you need to protect your camera from.

(via ALTFoto)

Does Bringing a Camera onto an Airplane Damage Its Sensor?

Kodak uploaded a video to YouTube recently thats been causing quite a bit of controversy. It’s a talk by Rob Hummel at Cine Gear Expo 2011 in which he states that bringing your digital camera onto an airplane will damage its sensor and cause dead pixels (it’s about 8min into the video). The reasoning is that at altitudes of 20,000ft and higher, you would need 125ft of concrete to shield yourself from the gamma rays, which induce voltages in the sensors and fry the photo sites. He also claims that manufacturers only transport cameras by sea, and that they all keep quiet about this because they fear a class action lawsuit.

The comments on the YouTube video and the dpreview forums are filled with people who believe that this is simply an attempt by Kodak to spread fear, uncertainty and doubt (FUD) over digital cameras in an effort to lure more people to using film. So, which is it? Fact or FUD?

(via dpreview and Photo Rumors)

Tsunami-leveled City Sendai Home to Major Nikon Manufacturing Plant

The massive 8.9-magnitude earthquake that devastated Japan today was located just east of the city of Sendai, which subsequently suffered major damage due to the resulting tsunami. What you might not know is that the city is home to Nikon’s flagship manufacturing facility — the plant that produces Nikon’s professional DSLRs (e.g. D3s, D3x and D700). Fortunately, Nikon reports that there have been no reports of injuries among its employees in that city, and the plant seems to have escaped serious damage as well.
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Salvaging Water-Damaged Photos

Do you know what to do if one of your prints gets damaged by water? If you living in a flood prone area (or are clumsy), it’d be good to know.

The Conservation Center for Art and Historic Artifacts (CCAHA) has an informative technical bulletin titled “Salvaging Photographs”, that provides a rundown on the response you should take to water damage.

One of the interesting tips is to freeze your prints to prevent further damage:

Freezing to help retard further deterioration by water or mold may be necessary if the materials cannot be treated immediately. Storage at low temperatures buys time in which to safely plan and organize the many steps needed to dry the affected materials and to prepare a rehabilitation site.

Vacuum freeze-drying can help you recover the prints:

In this method, photographic materials—either wet or frozen—are placed in a vacuum chamber. As the vacuum is pulled, a low heat source is introduced and the photographs are carefully dried at temperatures below freezing.

Some additional tips from the document:

  • Keep immersion time to an absolute minimum
  • Treat least stable items (i.e. prints rather than negatives) first
  • Keep identifying information near the prints
  • Never let the prints dry in contact with any surface, since it may stick permanently

If there’s any chance you might have to deal with recovering wet prints, this PDF would be a good thing to bookmark, save, or print out.

(via Lifehacker)


Image credit: Flood series by cikaga jamie