Posts Tagged ‘d600’

Teardowns of Nikon D600 Reveal Sony Sensor, Hard-to-Replace LCD Screen

Yesterday we featured a photographer’s DIY teardown of the Nikon D700, offering a peek at the camera’s guts. It was interesting, but a bit outdated since the camera was released back in July 2008. iFixit and Chipworks have just finish their own teardowns of a camera that’s much more recent: the Nikon D600 “entry-level” full-frame DSLR.
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The Nikon D600 Has Sensor Dust Issues

We tend not to get too excited about sensor dust problems at LensRentals; we clean sensors on every camera after every rental, so it’s just routine. When we started carrying the Nikon D600, they all arrived with a fair amount of dust, but that’s pretty routine, too. Manufacturing and shipping can be a dusty experience.
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Ken Rockwell on “Nikon’s Big Deception” with the D600, D800 and D4

Proto-photo-blogger Ken Rockwell has interesting things to say about what he calls “Nikon’s big deception.” If you’re currently considering the new D600, his “What’s New in September 2012″ words will be music to your ears:

Holy cow, I just realized Nikon’s big deception: the D600, D800, D800E and D4 are all the same cameras designed and produced in parallel at the same time and all have the same insides, producing the same images with the same processing power, same LCDs, same green-shift problems and identical AF controls. They differ only in exterior packaging and when Nikon chose to announce them to make them appear different. It’s just like 1980 again!

Back when Nikon ruled the pro 35mm world, all their 35mm cameras took the same pictures. The only differences were how tough and how fast they were. Consumer cameras like the EM were plasticy and worked OK, while the F3 was tough and fast, with the FE in the middle. All took the same film and same lenses, had the same meters, the same automatic modes, all focused the same, and all took exactly the same pictures.

[…] Today, Nikon’s 2012 FX trio of D600, D800 and D4 obviously were all designed and manufactured at the same time with the same innards, and merely announced in descending cost order at different times to try to hide the simple fact that they’re the same camera inside.

So Rockwell’s claim is that Nikon is taking the same powerful guts of the D4 and hamstringing it in various ways (e.g. firmware, build, features) in order to target different segments of the camera market — the same thing Canon is doing with the 1D X and 1D C.

Nikon D600 Sensor Found by DxOMark to be “Elite” and 3rd Best Ever

Nikon’s new entry level full frame DSLR, the Nikon D600, is supposed to be a lightweight camera with heavyweight image quality. DxOMark confirms it to be true. The camera equipment measurement company has announced its sensor quality results for the D600, and the score is sure to put a big smile on the faces of Nikonians around the world. Rated at an overall score of “94”, the camera received the third highest score ever, and falls in third place behind the D800 and D800E — cameras that cost roughly $1,000 more.
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Hands-on with the Nikon D600, a More Affordable Full Frame DSLR

Immediately after handling the Canon 6D, we also got a chance to play around with the new Nikon D600. Unlike the 6D, Nikon’s cameras were locked down to the display booth, making it more difficult to get a feel for the weight. However, based on the announced specs alone, we know that the Nikon camera is even lighter than the already-light 6D (760g vs 770g), though it is a bit chunkier in its dimensions. Despite being so light, the D600 also feels quite sturdy. It’s cheap in its price but not in its build quality.
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Strobists Beware: The Nikon D600 Lacks a Sync Jack and Has 1/200th Sync

Announced this morning, Nikon’s new D600 is a powerful little full frame DSLR at an unprecedented price point, and should be quite popular among photographers looking to upgrade from a crop sensor camera. At $2,100, it’s more than a grand cheaper than Canon’s lowest-level full frame: the Canon 5D Mark III. However, the camera isn’t geared towards every kind of photographer. David Hobby of Strobist states that Nikon has completely overlooked one segment: photographers who are serious about off-camera lighting:

The first thing, and given recent history something not unexpected, is the lack of a sync jack. I was pissed off surprised when the D7000 didn’t include it. But a full-frame body without a sync jack? That’s just a little weird.

It has a 1/200th sync. Game over. […] True, it is only a third of a stop as compared to 1/250th. But with speedlights and daylight, that is a critical third of a stop. To be clear, this camera makes every single flash you own less effective.

Also, the difference between 1/250th and 1/200th sync is deadly when it comes to stopping action when balancing flash and ambient. 1/250th is dicey enough. 1/200th just doesn’t work.

There are currently rumors floating around that Canon may be gearing up to launch a cheaper full frame DSLR as well, possibly to be called the Canon 6D. If it does materialize in the next month or two, it’ll be interesting to see how the price point and feature set stack up against the D600.

Nikon D600: Think Twice Before You Jump [Strobist]

Nikon Unveils the D600, a Portable and “Affordable” Full Frame DSLR

After months of rumors and speculation, Nikon has finally announced its new full frame camera, the D600. In terms of specs, the rumors were right on. However, we missed the mark by quite a bit regarding the price. We’ll come back to that later.

The D600 is in fact the company’s “entry level” full frame DSLR, designed to bring the benefits of an FX-format sensor to enthusiasts who were previously unwilling to take the plunge. The camera features a 24.3 megapixel CMOS sensor, an ISO range of 100-6400 (expandable to 50-25600), a 39-point autofocus system (9 cross-type points), a 0.13 second startup time and a 0.052 shutter lag, 5.5fps continuous shooting, dual SD card slots, a viewfinder with 100% coverage, built-in HDR, 1080p HD video recording with full-time AF, and a 3.2-inch LCD.
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Nikon D600 Coming Very Soon, May Offer Full Frame for Just $1500

More details are emerging about Nikon’s affordable full frame DSLR, the D600. Nikon Rumors reports that the camera will almost certainly be on display at Photokina next month, which means that the announcement will likely come around the time the show opens on September 18th. The camera is said to offer a full frame sensor at a price previously unseen in the market — possibly as low as $1500. To put that in comparison, Canon’s crop sensor 7D hit the market at $1700 when it was released back in 2009. $1500 for a full frame would be ridiculous and game-changing.
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First Photos of Nikon’s D600 Entry-Level Full Frame Leaked

Entry-level full frame rumors are certainly getting their time in the spotlight today. Immediately following rumors that the 7D Mark II might become the Canon FF entry-level we’ve all been waiting for, we now have the first pictures of Nikon’s D600. Initial rumors about the entry-level full frame, which is supposed to be the true sequel to the D700, were met with significant reservations, but these pictures seem to leave no more doubt that the camera really is in the works. Read more…

Nikon May Turn to Aptina for Its Entry-Level Full-Frame Sensor

The latest rumor circulating around the “entry-level full-frame” topic is that Nikon may shying away from Sony when it comes to getting a full-frame sensor for the rumored D600. The rumor came as a result of an article on the Italian website MarsicaLive, which stated that Aptina Imaging is designing a new full-frame CMOS sensor for DSLRs; they also write that — according to unconfirmed rumors — the sensor is being designed specifically for Nikon. Although this is the first full-frame sensor designed by Aptina, Nikon is already familiar with the company as the V1 mirrorless camera already uses one of Aptina’s sensors.

(via Nikon Rumors)


Image credit: Aptina by DIKESH.com