Posts Tagged ‘crowdsourced’

Stereogranimator: Create Your Own 3D Photos Using Vintage Stereographs

The New York Public Library has a massive collection of over 40,000 vintage stereographs (two photos taken from slightly different points of view). To properly share them with the world in 3D, the library has launched a new tool called the Stereogranimator. It lets you convert an old stereograph into either an animated 3D GIF (which uses “wiggle stereoscopy“) or an anaglyph (the kind that requires special glasses).
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A Crowdsourced Remake of Star Wars

Star Wars Uncut is a remake of the original Star Wars movie created with the power of crowdsourcing. The project started back in 2009 after creator Casey Pugh sliced the original movie into 15 second segments and asked volunteers to use their creativity to recreate the scenes at home. The best clips were combined into a feature length film, which went on to win an Emmy Award in 2010 for “Outstanding Creative Achievement In Interactive Media”. Above is the recently-released director’s cut of the film.

Star Wars Uncut (via Laughing Squid)

How Do People Respond to a Disposable Camera Left Unattended in Public?

This video shows a social experiment in which disposable cameras were left unattended in various public locations with a simple message: “Take a Photo”. Hidden cameras were stationed nearby to observe how people responded to the cameras, and to provide some behind-the-scenes footage to how the various photographs were captured.

Photos from Disposable Cameras Left with Notes in Various NYC Locations

A few weeks ago, Brooklyn resident Katie O’Beirne did a weekend project in which she left a disposable camera on a Prospect Park bench with a note asking passer-bys to snap a photograph. After getting the film developed and finding some cool photos, O’Beirne decided to continue with the project, leaving disposable cameras in a number of other spots around NYC. The resulting photographs can be seen on a Tumblr page she set up called “new york shots“.
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Watch the Crowdsourced Documentary ‘Life In A Day’ For Free

Life In A Day‘ is a historic crowdsourced documentary film that shows what the world was like on a single day: July 24, 2010. People in 140 countries around the world captured snippets from their lives on that day and submitted 80,000 video clips to YouTube. Oscar-winning director Kevin Macdonald and executive producer Ridley Scott then edited those 4,500 hours of footage into a 95 minute long feature film. After debuting at Sundance and being streamed on YouTube earlier this year, the film is now free to watch. Enjoy.

(via YouTube via PhotoWeeklyOnline)

Indie Band Creates Music Video Using Crowdsourced Instagram Photos

Instagram is changing not just the way photos can be shared, but how music videos can be made. UK indie rock band The Vaccines recently created a website that asked fans to snap photographs of themselves while at music festivals and then tag them with “#VACCINESVIDEO”. After receiving nearly 3,000 submissions, the band used them to create the music video for their song “Wetsuit”. Aside from a few video clips, everything you see in the video was submitted through Instagram.

(via Mashable)


P.S. Building upon this idea: what if a band were to ask fans to snap photos during a live performance of a song, and then combine the photos afterward using the timestamps of the photos to sync them with the song? That would be crazy.

A Crowdsourced Photographic Map of the World through Time

Google Street View is neat in that it allows you to step into far away places through street-level photographs, but it’s missing the fourth dimension: time. WhatWasThere is an awesome project that aims to combine the element of time with a photographic map of the world. The map includes both modern day and historical imagery, and users can contribute their photographs by tagging them with a date and a time. The site even lets you switch to Google’s Street View and overlay historical photos onto their present day images!

WhatWasThere (via Laughing Squid)

Magnum Turns to Crowdsourcing to Tag Their Massive Photo Collection

Want to play role in the legendary agency Magnum Photos? Well, now you can as a “Magnum Tagger”. The cooperative is having a tough time keeping their large archive of historical photographs organized and easily searchable. Of the 500,000 images they’ve uploaded to the web, about 200,000 have little or no associated metadata. Magnum has decided to tackle this problem by crowdsourcing it, asking for volunteers to sift through the photographs and add useful information. For the trial run they’re looking for 50 volunteers, which shouldn’t be hard to find given the hundreds of thousands of followers they have on sites like Twitter and Facebook.

Maybe they should take a page out of Google’s book by turning image tagging into a game!

(via Popular Photography)

Leica MP-36 Owned by “Famous Photographer” Listed on eBay for $104K

There’s an old beat up Leica MP-36 being sold by a reputable seller on eBay (8533 feedback score with 99.4% positive) for the staggering price of $104,000. What’s strange is that the details provided in the listing are quite sparse. The page includes a few photographs and the description,

The camera comes with matching black paint Summicron 2/5cm no.1474879, first version with black bayonet mount, a matching black paint Leicavit MP. The camera was the property of famous photographer

Perhaps some crowdsourced investigation can shed some light on this unique listing. Any idea what’s so special about this camera and/or who the “famous photographer” mentioned is? Check out the listing here.


Update: Apparently the camera belonged to Leif Engberg. Kudos to Nutzibe


Update: Wow. Looks like the camera actually sold for $104K… Gizmodo jumped on the story here.


Thanks for the tip, Christian!

Thousands of People in 21 Countries Walking in Stop-Motion

life.turns. is a creative crowd-sourced stop-motion project by photo sharing service Blipfoto. By dividing the motion of a human walking into eight simple frames, they invited contributors to submit photos of people in one of the eight poses. 1025 photos were submitted in 40 days. After putting the submissions in sequence and aligning them, what resulted was a stop-motion video of thousands of people in 21 different countries walking.
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