Posts Tagged ‘crop’

Crop or Crap: Zack Arias Takes a Real-World Look at the Crop vs Full-Frame Debate

Zack Arias is a man who knows his gear inside and out. Switching multiple times between various companies, he’s seen almost everything there is to see in terms of equipment. In the past, he’s continuously praised full-frame sensors, for their quality and the aesthetic they’re known for.

But lately, as many you may know, he’s fallen in love with the FujiFilm X-Series. It’s this switch that lead him to realize that while full-frame most certainly has its benefits, crop sensors com with a myriad of their own benefits. In the above video he takes a look at both full-frame and crop sensors, giving his honest outlook and opinions on both. Read more…

Handy Infographic is a Useful Social Media Image Size Cheat-Sheet

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The folks over at Constant Contact recently put together a handy little infographic that will help you better manage and properly ‘dress up’ your the growing collection of social media accounts. Read more…

Tony Northrup Makes Corrections, Replies to Critics in Part 3 of Camera Spec Debate

In this third — and final? — installment of his “camera companies are lying to you about crop factor” series that has caused such a stir, Tony Northrup hopes to silence the critics, make some corrections, and overall bring this debate to a close. Read more…

A Concise Explanation of How Crop Factor Affects Both Focal Length AND Aperture

Editor’s Note: Due to some issues with the camera, this video is very shaky at times. It didn’t bother us much, but if you’re easily distracted this video might annoy more than it educates you. You’ve been warned.


If you’re just getting into the world of cameras and lenses, the term “crop factor” and phrases like “this is a 35mm equivalent lens” might still confuse you. Well, that shouldn’t be the case much longer.

The video above offers a clear, concise and simple explanation of crop factor that will hopefully clear all of this up and equip you with some important knowledge that will come in handy the next time you’re shopping for a lens or crop sensor body. Read more…

Getty Embed Tool Already Subverted: You Can Crop Out the Credit Line

Update: It looks like it’s already been fixed. Kudos to Getty for the quick response.


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Getty’s embed tool has been live for less than 24 hours and ALREADY somebody has figured out how it can be taken advantage of. It turns out that all it takes is some extremely simple code to remove attribution entirely. Read more…

A Guide on Good and Bad Places to Crop on Your Portrait Subject

croppingguide

If you need to chop off portions of the human body while cropping a photograph, where should you draw the line? The folks over at Digital Camera World have released this helpful graphic with suggestions on appropriate and inappropriate areas to crop at:

Portrait photography is challenging for a whole host of reasons. Getting your portrait right in-camera is only half the battle. Knowing how to edit your portraits can be quite difficult when it comes to cropping a photo. Cropping in an awkward position on your subject can end up ruining a perfectly good shot. [...] we’ve put together this easy guide for understanding some of the best places to crop a subject in a portrait, and some of the places where you should not. ‘Yes’ areas are marked in green, while ‘bad’ locations are marked in red.

This new infographic is nearly identical to one we shared two years ago, except it’s larger and clearer, and therefore more print friendly. You can download the full-resolution version of the image here.

Free portrait photography cropping guide [Digital Camera World]


Thanks for sending in the tip, Sam!

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Trick: Easily Set Photos to “Private” in iOS by Cropping Them Down

If you own an iOS device, you’ve probably noticed that the Camera Roll in the native Photos app doesn’t come with any way to mark photographs as private. For this reason, the App Store features a large number of apps (both paid and free) designed to offer that feature, allowing you to choose what to show and what not to when someone else is flipping through your photographs. If you want an easy way to “mark photos as private” without having to download a special app (or pay money for a fancy one), Amit Agarwal over at Digital Inspiration offers this simple trick: crop them.
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Untouched Sample Shots Captured with Nokia’s New 41MP Camera Phone

Nokia has released a set of sample photographs in order to show off the camera quality of its new 41MP 808 PureView camera phone. The 33.3MB ZIP file contains just 3 untouched JPEG images — the largest of which (seen above) is a 5368×7152, 38-megapixel photograph that weighs in at 10.3MB. The quality is quite impressive, given that the images were captured with a phone.
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Strange and Beautiful Crop Patterns Photographed From Space

Farmlands might look pretty ordinary from ground level, but photograph crop fields from space (or even from an airplane) and you’ll see strange and beautiful patterns.
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Crop Guidelines for Portrait Photography

Here’s a helpful illustration that shows acceptable places to crop when shooting portraits. Cropping at green lines should be fine, while cropping at red lines might leave you with an awkward looking photograph.


Image credit: Don’t Chop at the red by J. Southard Photography