Posts Tagged ‘create’

Create a Gorgeous Hyperlapse Video with Google Street View Photographs

Hyperlapse photography involves shooting a series of photographs over large distances and then stringing the photos together into a time-lapse video that zooms the viewer through the locations. Creating a real hyperlapse involves quite a bit of work, so the folks over at Teehan+Lax Labs decided to go virtual by turning to Google Street View to source the necessary photos.

The gorgeous hyperlapse video above was created entirely using Google Street View photos, and shows the locations visited by the Street View camera van in a way that’s very different from what you see through your browser.
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How to Create a Homemade Large Format Pinhole Camera Using a Shoebox

shoebox1

This camera is a poor man’s large format camera. It is made with a simple shoebox acting as a dark room.
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Make Your Own Custom-Painted Camera Strap Using Cotton Webbing

Design Lovefest has a tutorial on how you can make a custom-designed camera strap using 1 1/2-inch natural cotton webbing and acrylic craft paint.

Make It Camera Strap (via Craftzine)

Make Personalized Bookmarks Using 35mm Film Strips

If you have some unwanted 35mm negatives lying around and need a simple gift idea, you can try your hand at turning them into one-of-a-kind bookmarks. Simply cut out the actual frames from the film strip and replace them with actual photographs to create film strips that you don’t need to hold up to the light to enjoy.

Create a Stylish Bookmark with 35mm Film [Lomography]

A Great Collection of Photo Craft Ideas by Kodak

Kodak’s website has a “Create” section stocked with all kinds of different photo projects for various purposes and occasions, from things for the home to gifts for the holidays.

Create [Kodak]

Scientists Develop a Camera 10 Microns Thick that Creates Images with Math

Thought the grain-of-salt-sized camera announced in Germany earlier this year was small? Well, researchers at Cornell have created a camera just 1/100th of a millimeter thick and 1mm on each size that has no lens or moving parts. The Planar Fourier Capture Array (PFCA) is simply a flat piece of doped silicon that cost just a few cents each. After light information is gathered, some fancy mathematical magic (i.e. the Fourier transform) turns the information into a 20×20 pixel “photo”. The fuzzy photo of the Mona Lisa above was shot using this camera.

Obviously, the camera won’t be very useful for ordinary photography, but it could potentially be extremely useful in science, medicine, and gadgets.

(via Cornell Chronicle via Engadget)

PicScatter Helps You Make “Hacked” Facebook Profile Photographs

Last week Alexandre Oudin’s creative Facebook portrait idea spread like wildfire on the Interwebs, and was even featured by CNN. If you’d like to do the same thing with a portrait or photograph of yours but don’t have the time or technical know-how to do so, there’s a new website called Pic Scatter that does all the work for you. All you need to do is upload and resize and reposition the image to your liking, and the website will allow you to download all the individual photos for the “hacked” profile pic. The only downside is that a “Made with picScatter.com” bar is added to your image.
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Watch Your Life Flash Before Your Eyes with Pummelvision

Pummelvision is a neat little website that aims to help you see your life flash before your eyes by taking your Flickr, Facebook, and Tumblr photos, combining them into a rapid-fire slideshow set to music. Once the video is done the service uploads it to Vimeo or YouTube for you. The above is an example Pummelvision video created with the photos of Justin Ouellette of chromogenic (we interviewed him a while back).

Pummelvision (via Lifehacker)

Print a Cardboard 35mm Pinhole Camera

Francesco Capponi (Dippold on Flickr) has a fun printable template for creating your own nifty-looking 35mm pinhole camera.

All you need to do is print out the template on adhesive paper (size A4) and stick it onto some cardboard. Once you’ve cut out all the required pieces, follow the visual instructions provided to put it together:

Unlike many other paper pinhole camera projects we’ve seen, the final result for this one actually looks pretty nice, and will definitely make a conversation piece. If you do take the time to make this thing, be sure to report back to us with the resulting photographs!

(via Make)


Image credits: Photographs by Francesco Capponi and used with permission.

Fashion World Markets for Photo Industry

Fashion label LeSportsac will be joining with Canon in its release of a case designed exclusively for the PowerShot camera, the companies announced today.

No big surprise here; the fashion industry has always worked hand-in-hand with the photography industry. Photography has always played an integral part in marketing fashion.

However, the tables are turning, and designer names are now a major marketing point for photo gear.

Consumer-level cameras are abundant. Every major manufacturer has several new models of point-and-shoots each year, a testament to the power of the consumer in the imaging industry. However, in a market flooded with similar products, manufacturers scramble to distinguish themselves from the next big company.

Late last year, Lady Gaga contributed some star power to Polaroid as she joined the company as a creative director. Polaroid’s most recently garnered a prominent feature in Gaga’s latest music video, Telephone, featuring Beyonce. Celebrity spokespersons such as Ashton Kutcher for Nikon are also a recent marketing trend in drawing public interest in photo products.

Last month at PMA, GE announced a new point-and-shoot collaboration with fashion designer Jason Wu called Create by Jason Wu, whose line includes colorful cameras and stylish carrying cases. The cameras will be released this April, but GE’s running a contest this month for autographed editions of the product.

Any thoughts on this trend? Would a designer name interest you next time you shop for a camera?