Posts Tagged ‘coverphoto’

How I Shot a Photo of Johnny Manziel for the Cover of ESPN The Magazine

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With the college football season winding down, I had the assignment of covering the last Texas A&M home game. The last game I was available to shoot was the second to last home game against Sam Houston State University. This game was just a week after A&M upset the Alabama Roll Tide in Alabama, and Johnny Manziel was instantly catapulted into the rare position of becoming a freshman Heisman finalist.
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Shooting a Portrait of Richard Branson for the Cover of Wired UK

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Up. That’s all you need to say. Last November, we took on a project with Wired UK magazine to photograph Richard Branson’s latest venture in attempting to conquer the final frontier: space. We spent the good part of a week in the deserts of New Mexico and California, photographing the spaces and places, the infrastructure, the people, and ultimately Sir Richard himself.
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New York Magazine Cover Features Photo of a Blacked-Out New York City

Everyone seems to be talking about the cover photo of this week’s issue of New York Magazine. It shows NYC blacked out after Hurricane Sandy, and was captured last Wednesday by Dutch photographer Iwan Baan from the open door of a helicopter 5,000 feet above the ground. Poynter has published an interesting behind-the-scenes look at how it was shot:

Baan made the image Wednesday night after the storm, using the new Canon 1D X with the new 24-70mm lens on full open aperture. The camera was set at 25,000 ISO, with a 1/40th of a second shutter speed […]

It was more difficult to rent a car than a helicopter in New York the day after Sandy, Baan said. And because there was such limited air traffic so soon after the storm, air traffic control allowed Baan and the helicopter to hover very high above the city, a powerful advantage for the photo.

NY Mag editors say that picking the cover photo was the easiest choice they had to make this past week. They’ve also published a slideshow featuring 10 aerial photographs Baan captured that night.

Architecture photographer explains how he got that New York magazine cover shot [Poynter]


Image credit: Photograph by Iwan Baan/New York Magazine

Gregory Heisler’s Controversial Photo of President George H.W. Bush for TIME

American portrait photographer Gregory Heisler (whom we featured yesterday) is probably best known for his 70+ cover portrait photos for TIME magazine. One of his most famous portraits shows a double exposure, “two faced” photo of President George H.W. Bush. The photograph, shot entirely in-camera, was used as the first TIME “Person of the Year” cover photo.
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X-ray Image of a Nikon Photographer

Photographer Nick Veasey created this amazing X-ray image of a Nikon photographer for the Focus on Imaging 2010 catalog cover. It’s a composite, with the image of the camera itself requiring 12 separate X-rays.
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The Going Rate for a Time Cover Photo

Slate magazine just published an interesting article on David Hobby and his popular blog Strobist, and shared this interesting example of how the photography industry is drastically changing due to low barriers of entry:

To get a sense of just how bad things are for professional photographers right now, the story of Robert Lam is instructive. When Time needed a photo to illustrate its “New Frugality” cover story in late 2009, it purchased Lam’s image of a jar of change from stock-photo agency iStockphoto. The going rate for a Time cover had typically been $3,000 to $10,000. Lam was paid $31.50. Nevertheless, Lam declared, “I am happy”—the payment was more than he’d expected the photo to generate, and he was delighted to have a Time cover in his portfolio. Veteran professional photographers were livid, calling Lam an “IDIOT,” among other unkind words.

The article also mentions how Robert Lam earns just $4,000 from his stock photography hobby, and that the Time cover photo was shot using DIY equipment purchased from a local sign store. What are your thoughts on the changing landscape for professional photographers?