Posts Tagged ‘copyright’

Kickstarter Campaign at the Center of a Controversy Over Stolen Images

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The wildly successful Kickstarter campaign Blackprints is currently at the center of a heated controversy over stolen images that has already involved one copyright dispute. It seems that the campaign’s creator, Sabrina Chun, might have taken to acquiring photos of cars off of the Internet, changing them to black and white minimalist versions, and selling them as part of this campaign. (See Update) Read more…

UK Passes Controversial Copyright Act, May Yield a ‘Firestorm’ of Litigation

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A “copyright land-grab” that will “permit the commercial exploitation of [orphan] images” and lead to a “firestorm” of litigation. Those are the terms being used by some to describe a UK bill that just received Royal Assent last week, despite drawing fire from writers and photographers the world over. Read more…

A Flowchart For Figuring Out Which CC License You Should Use

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Creative Commons is a non-profit organization founded in 2001 that, over the years, has released a set of licenses that enable creative types to share their work with others. The content creator allows others to use their work, just as long as the users follow the guidelines set forth in that particular license. It’s a “some rights reserved” system rather than an “all rights reserved system.”

In the photographic community, some aren’t fond of CC licensing while others are downright prolific about it. But if you’re looking to license some of your content in this way, this useful infographic put together by CC Australia will help you navigate the common licensing combinations. Read more…

Photographers Upset Over eBay Account Selling Copyrighted Photographs

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While browsing the internet recently, SportsShooter user Greg Bartram stumbled on an eBay store that was selling prints of several of his images. Upon taking a closer look, he realized that it wasn’t just him, ukgobigblueuk is selling 8x10s of just about any sports, celebrity or political photo he can get his hands on — and according to his description, he can “more than likely” get his hands on any photo you want. Read more…

Appeals Court Overturns Previous Ruling, Rules Fair Use in Richard Prince Case

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There’s a fine line between fair use, copyright infringement, and downright theft. And while some might argue where exactly that line stands, “rephotographer” and appropriation artist Richard Prince just got a Federal Appeals Court to take his side in what may turn out to be a landmark ruling regarding fair use. Read more…

Like Farmers Profiting By Hosting Stolen Photos on Facebook

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I’d love to say I coined the term “Like farm”, but it’s entirely possible I read it somewhere before, as a brief search on that term turned up other articles on the growing phenomenon of content farms on Facebook. For a while now, I’ve been watching my own news feed fill up with unattributed photos and artwork. And I think we’ve all seen the equally unattributed and ubiquitous quote art (either graphic design or simply pasted over photos). Although the amount of this content seems to rise and fall, it has seemed like it is growing of late. Or perhaps I’ve just become more sensitive to it?
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Copyright Infringement and the Culture of Suing Artists Into Submission

Andy Baio has some experience with copyright infringement, especially where iconic photographs are concerned. In case you didn’t read our previous coverage on the matter, his story goes something like this: in 2009, he put together an 8-bit version of Miles Davis’ album “Kind of Blue” called “Kind of Bloop,” and for the cover art he had a friend create a pixel-art version of Jay Maisel‘s famous cover photo.

Maisel wound up suing Baio for over $100,000 for the infringement, and despite an offer for free representation, potential court costs still forced Baio to settle out of court for $32,500. Baio wound up writing a long blog post about the matter, and now, a couple of years later, he’s expanded on that post in the above talk he gave at Creative Mornings in Portland. Read more…

Photog Countersued by Football Player in ‘Trophy Pose’ Infringement Case

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In 1991, photographer Brian Masck took one of the most iconic photographs in all of sports. Known forevermore as the “Trophy Pose,” it captured then Michigan Wolverine Desmond Howard striking a Heisman pose IRL. Since it was taken, the photo has been used by everyone from EA to Nissan to Sports Illustrated, and several of them are now being sued by Masck for using the photo without his permission — including Desmond Howard himself. Read more…

Man Caught Trying to Sell Book of Boston Bombing Press Photographs on Amazon

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The Boston Marathon bombing was a horrific event that took three lives and left more than 170 people injured; the idea that somebody would try to profit from that is unthinkable. And yet, someone already has.

Only one day after the bombings, a man by the name of Steve Goldstein used numerous photos from The AP, Getty Images and The New York Times without permission in order to create and sell an eBook titled “The Boston Bombings First Photos” on Amazon. Read more…

NPPA Joins Fifteen Others in Copyright Suit Against Google Books

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The National Press Photographers Association has decided to throw their hat in the ring with 15 other organizations that are all suing Google over what they see as “widespread, well-publicized, and uncompensated infringement of exclusive rights” perpetrated by the search giant’s Google Books program. Read more…