Posts Tagged ‘copyright’

The Economics of Copyright Infringement in Robert Caplin vs Perez Hilton

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Freelance photographer Robert Caplin filed a copyright infringement and DMCA violation complaint on June 26, 2013 against Mario Armando Lavandeira, Jr., aka Perez Hilton. Hilton is best described as an Internet gossip blogger, who has been known to appropriate copyrighted images and then “transform” them by drawing captions, tears, or other scribbles, and thereby claiming “fair use.”

His well-trafficked entertainment blog sells advertising to support itself. Caplin is a regular contributor to the New York Times, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times. He also runs The Photo Brigade, is a prolific Instagrammer, and is an all around great guy. And I don’t like to see Perez Hilton stick it to great guys.
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‘Super Bowl Shuffle’ Photographer Sues Over Use of Photo in News Story

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The photographer who captured images of the Chicago Bears doing the “Super Bowl Shuffle” is suing the Chicago Tribune and Fox Sports for allegedly misappropriating the images.
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Bing Now Allows You to Filter Your Image Searches by Licence

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As the saying goes: “better late than never.” In a move that puts Bing on par with the likes of Google’s and Yahoo’s image search engines, Microsoft’s search giant has just added licensing refinements to its image searching capabilities as well. Read more…

NYTimes Photographer Sues Perez Hilton for $2.1M Over Copyright Infringement

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BuzzFeed isn’t the only blog that’s routinely accused of using photographs without permission. American celebrity blogger Perez Hilton (above right) is being whacked with a $2.1 million lawsuit by New York Times photographer Robert Caplin (above left) for publishing 14 photographs without permission.
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Photographer Sues BuzzFeed for $3.6M for Using Photo Without Permission

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A photographer is suing the popular viral content aggregation website BuzzFeed for a whopping $3.9 million after he discovered that BuzzFeed had used one of his Flickr photos without permission in a comedy “roundup” article.
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Vogue Photo Contest an ‘Effort to Secure Thousands of Free Images,’ ASMP Says

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A handful of groups representing professional photographers are calling for a boycott of a Conde Nast photo contest whose terms they consider exploitative.
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Photog Posts Free-to-Share Photos of the Turkish Protests to Help Spread the Word

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Charles Emir Richards is only a part-time photographer, but in the industry of photojournalism, being in the right place at the right time can be almost as important as photographic skill. And it’s this that Richards has in spades: the right place at the right time.

The protests currently going on in Turkey that have attracted national attention are happening right in Richards’ backyard. And as he’s amassed more and more photos of the clash between people and police, he’s taken to Facebook to share those photos freely, allowing anyone to use them in the name of spreading the word. Read more…

Tumblr Blog Shares Ten Copyright-Free High-Res Images Every Ten Days

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Unsplash is a new Tumblr creation by the folks over at ooompf that allows photographers to share a set of images for free (in exchange for exposure, we assume) while simultaneously allowing those in need of high-quality imagery a place to find it. Read more…

News Website Erroneously Uses Photo of DigitalRev’s Kai to Illustrate Assault Story

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Major news website News.com.au made a pretty big mistake yesterday. At the top of an article titled “Bizarre: Man gropes woman’s thigh, then photographs her“, author Phil Hickey (or whomever was in charge) decided to use a photo of none other than DigitalRev TV’s Kai Wong. Read more…

Canadian Anti-Piracy Site Caught Using Photos Without Permission

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Canipre — short for Canadian Intellectual Property Rights Enforcement — is a Canadian anti-piracy company that has joined hand-in-hand with film studios and record companies to track down those who steal and share stolen content over the internet. On the surface there’s nothing wrong with this, what is wrong is when an intellectual property advocate is found using photos without permission, which is exactly what happened to Canipre a couple of days ago. Read more…