Posts Tagged ‘contest’

Nikon Photo Contest No Longer Accepts Photos Shot Using Film Cameras

Another sign of the times (and bad news for film-photography enthusiasts): one of the most prestigious photo competitions in the world no longer accepts film photographs. Earlier this week Nikon published a “call for entries” for its 34th Nikon Photo Contest. Here’s what the entry guidelines say about “Eligible Works”:

Image data files created with digital cameras (including medium- and large-format cameras). Images that have been retouched using software or by other means will be accepted. Both color and monochrome images will be accepted. (Scans of photographs taken with film cameras are not eligible.)

The contest has been held since 1969 to “provide an opportunity for photographers around the world to communicate and to enrich photographic culture for professionals and amateurs alike.”
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200 Yards: A Photo Project Documenting SF Through a Hyperlocal Lens

200 Yards is a neat photo project based in San Francisco that centers around the idea of having photographers point cameras at a small section of a particular city. For each cycle, organizers pick a particular “alternative gallery space” and invite photographers to create photographs within a 200-yard radius of that location (this translates to roughly one block in each direction). Submissions are then whittled down until 12 photographers remain, and these artists are invited to the resulting exhibition at the gallery space.

200 Yards (via Photojojo)

World Press Photo of the Year 2012

This powerful photograph by photographer Samuel Aranda was introduced today as the World Press Photo of the Year 2012. The description reads,

A woman holds a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011.

The image was selected from 101,254 photos that were submitted to the World Press Photo 2012 competition by 5,247 photographers in 124 countries. You can check out all the other winners in the different categories on The Big Picture and over on the World Press Photo website.

Amazing Footage of Chick Embryo Wins Nikon’s Small World in Motion Contest

Anna Franz, a researcher at the the Sir William Dunn School of Pathology at Oxford, has won Nikon’s first annual Small World in Motion competition with an amazing video that shows the beating heart and blood vessels of a 72-hour-old chick embryo. Franz cut a window into an egg to expose the embryo, and then carefully injected ink into the yolk sac artery in order to visualize the beating heart and the vasculature of the embryo.

(via Nikon Small World via Feature Shoot)

How Much Beauty Can You Capture in One Second of Video?

The Beauty of a Second” is a short film competition asking people to capture “beauty”, but with a twist: each submitted video can only be one second long. Above is a compilation of entries submitted during the contest’s first round.

So how much beauty can be captured in just one second of footage? A whole lot — photography proves that.

The Beauty of a Second (via Boing Boing)

Google Launches Photo Contest to Find the “Stars of the Future”

In the first 100 days after Google+ was launched, 3.4 billion photographs were uploaded to the service. In light of this, Google is launching an international photo competition to “find the photography stars of the future.”

From far-away places to up-close faces, there are 10 different categories to spark your imagination. And there are some great prizes to be won: 10 finalists chosen by a jury of renowned photographers will show their work at Saatchi Gallery, London for two months in 2012 alongside Out of Focus, a major photography exhibition, and win a trip to London to attend the exhibition opening event with a friend. One winner will go on a once-in-a-lifetime trip to an amazing destination with a professional photography coach.

The contest is open to college students, and can be entered by uploading entries to Google+ and then submitting it through an online form. The deadline to enter is January 31, 2012.

Google Photography Prize (via Google)

Photos Recreating Famous Works of Art

Booooooom and Adobe have partnered up for a photo project and contest called “Remake“, which asks people to recreate famous works of art using photography.
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Porcelain Unicorn: A Powerful Short Film in Six Lines and Three Minutes

Last year Philips ran a contest called Parallel Lines in which they asked people to create a three-minute short film using only six lines of dialogue: “What is that?”, “It’s a unicorn”, “Never seen one up close before”, “Beautiful”, “Get away, get away”, and “I’m sorry”. After more than 600 entries were submitted, director Ridley Scott selected the above film, titled “Porcelain Unicorn”, as the winner.

You can also browse all the different entries on the contest page over on YouTube.

Porcelain Unicorn (via Reddit)

Sleeping Man Photo Wins BJP Award but Gets Bashed by Readers

The British Journal of Photography announced recently that South African photographer Michelle Sank’s image “Man asleep on the Golden Mile, Durban, South Africa.” had won the single image category of its International Photography Award.

The image, which shows a man asleep in a park just off the Golden Mile in Durban, was described by judges Nick Galvin, Bruno Ceschel and Diane Smyth as both surreal and disturbing, and was picked out from 338 other entries because of its quiet, enduring intensity. “The more I look at it, the more powerful it becomes,” commented Galvin, who manages the archive at Magnum London.

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Adobe Looking for the Next Photoshop Evangelist

Adobe is running a unique contest right now in search of the “next Photoshop evangelist”. Sadly, the winner isn’t given a special “evangelist” position in Adobe’s marketing department, but rather the prize package is pretty typical: a copy of CS5 Design Standard and a trip to Photoshop World in 2011 (which includes airfare, lodging, meals, and a chance to demo the winning tutorial).
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