Posts Tagged ‘construction’

Take Your Photography to New (Literal) Heights with a 12-Foot Tripod

There are times when all you need to capture the perfect photograph is just a few more feet in height. A common technique is to carry around and use a ladder to stand on and snap the needed photograph. But a ladder is far from convenient in terms of weight in size.

Thankfully, there’s an alternative that’s far smaller and not overly cost-prohibitive. It’s often called a construction tripod, laser tripod or contractors tripod and it’s a much smaller, more convenient way to get your camera high up in the sky.

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Construction Time-Lapse Shows the Step-by-Step Removal of a Dam

The 38-foot-high Gold Ray Dam had spanned Oregon’s Rogue River for 106 years by the time Jackson County decided enough was enough. A defunct hydroelectric facility that hadn’t been operational since the early 70s, it was one of the last fish barriers still up along the Rogue River. In other words: it had to go.

In the spirit of documenting the experience, the folks at HDRinc decided to employ time-lapse photography to capture the process of methodically tearing down the dam from start to finish. Read more…

Time-Lapse Shows World’s Largest Ship Being Built in 50,000 Photos

This time-lapse video shows the building of the largest ship in the world. It’s the first Maersk Line Triple-E vessel, which was constructed at the DSME shipyard in Okpo, Korea. The video shows three months of time, and consists of 50,000 photographs taken during that period.
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Photographs of Wooden Beams Matching the Lines of Buildings

woodencountour-9

Swiss photographers Taiyo Onorato and Nico Krebs (yes, the ones who created a large format camera out of books) have a clever series of photos that uses wooden beams to play around with a few things photographers often think about: lines, angles, and perspective.

For each of the photos, the duo constructed a structure of wooden beams that blends in with buildings in the background from the perspective of the camera. The resulting scene looks as though the wood magically connects the lines of the buildings with the foreground.
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BTS: Constructing and Using a Pegboard Backdrop for Starry Portraits

We’ve featured photographer Nick Fancher‘s pegboard backdrop experiments a couple of times now (see here and here), and each time the setup gets fleshed out a bit more. Yesterday, Fancher released the above time-lapse video that offers a behind-the-scenes look at how he constructed his “white room” inside his tiny basement (the ceiling is just 7-feet-hight).
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Time-Lapse Shows Eight Years of 1 WTC Construction in Just Two Minutes

Yesterday One World Trade Center officially became the tallest building in New York City. Since 2004, the EarthCam network has had cameras pointed at the construction site, documenting its progress. Taking images captured over the past eight years, the website created the mesmerizing time-lapse video above that shows eight years of construction in just two minutes.

The Associated Press also created its own time-lapse video showing construction from October 2010 to April 2012.

Building a Twin Lens Reflex Camera Out of Cardboard

Last month we shared some of Kiel Johnson‘s amazing cardboard camera creations, and now here’s a behind-the-scenes video showing how one of them (a twin lens reflex camera) was made. Kiel uses only three materials: cardboard, tape, and glue. I had no idea the cameras were so massive, since the photos he takes of them don’t show any indication of scale.

(via Virtual Photography Studio)


P.S. On an unrelated note, supposedly the above video is designed to be viewable on iPads and iPhones. Let us know if you’re on one of these devices and you can see the video!

Time-Lapse Video Spanning 3 Years and 45,000 Photographs

You’ve probably seen time-lapse videos spanning hours, days, weeks, or months, but how about years? Ramon, a videographer based in Paris, spent three years shooting the same location in Paris, documenting the teardown of an old skyscraper and the construction of a new one. The photographs were shot between January 2007 and September 2010 using a Pentax K110D DSLR, and a whopping 45,000 photographs were captured.

At the end of the video, the 3 years are played back in only 20 seconds. Crazy.


Thanks for the tip, David!