Posts Tagged ‘composite’

Composite Portraits of Various Kitchens

Like most people, your kitchen at home is probably littered with various items collected over the past months, years, or even decades. Photographer Erik Klein Wolterink has a project titled Kitchen Portraits in which he captured portraits of the kitchens of various ethnic groups within Amsterdam. Rather than photograph them from one angle, he opened up the cupboards, drawers, fridges, and ovens, and photographed each space individually. The images were then combined afterwards into detailed composite images that offer interesting snapshots of the spaces.
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Time-Lapse of a Plane Crash Composite Photo Being Created in Photoshop

Think you’re good with Photoshop? Graphic designer Alexander Koshelkov created this amazing time-lapse video showing how he created an epic plane crash image in Photoshop using elements found in other photographs (e.g. freeways, an airplane, destroyed engines and cars). The project took Koshelkov nearly 4.5 hours and required 244 separate layers.
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Nikon Patents In-Camera Feature for Sharper Panning Photographs

A new Nikon patent unearthed by Egami shows that the company has developed a new in-camera feature that assists in panning photographs. Tracking a moving subject with your camera and shooting a longer exposure shot creates photos that contain motion blur and a sense of action, but getting the subject perfectly sharp can be difficult. Nikon wants to use some fancy digital trickery to get around this problem. The feature snaps two photographs — one at a slower shutter speed and one at a faster one — and then selectively blends the images together. The subject subject in the fast shutter speed shot is extracted and used to replace the blurry one, producing an image that has a blurred background but sharp moving subject.

(via Egami)

Artificial Beauty Through Sparse Collaged Landscapes

Photographer Lauren Marsolier’s Transition series consists of minimalist landscape photographs of desolate locations. The various places don’t actually exist — Marsolier creates them by combining photographs captured in different places at different times.
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Composite Diner Photograph Shot with 24 Lights and 20 Subjects over 12 Hours

Here’s a video in which photographer Ryan Schude walks through how he went about shooting a photograph titled “The Diner”. The image involved 24 lights, 20 subjects, and 12 hours of shooting. Check out his crazy lighting diagram and the finished photo.

(via Scott Kelby via Fstoppers)

A Beautiful Composite Photo Showing the Moon, Jupiter, and Venus

This past Sunday, Jupiter and Venus put on a show by lining up with our moon (a conjunction). Rick Ellis of Toronto, Canada managed to create the awesome photo of the event seen above by capturing 31 separate frames. Each photo was taken 5 minute apart and had an exposure time of 5 seconds.

One Night, Dozens of Triple Conjunctions (via Geekosystem)


Image credit: Photograph by Rick Ellis

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Composite Image of Titanic on the Ocean Floor Created From 100,000 Photos

Researchers have created the first comprehensive image of the entire 3×5-mile debris field around the sinking of the Titanic:

Compiled from more than 100,000 photos taken by underwater robots, the composite image shows the world’s best remembered shipwreck in strikingly sharp detail. Although much of the debris is hidden, you can see how the ship split apart and tell by the debris that they hit the ground violently. In just over a month — April 15 — it will have been a century since the ship hit an iceberg and sunk to the bottom of the Atlantic.

(via The Atlantic via Photographs on the Brain)


Image credit: Photograph by RMS Titantic Inc.

85 Dancers From 22 Countries Stitched Into One Composite Music Video

Director Ninian Doff made this creative music video for singer Graham Coxon‘s song “What’ll It Take” by stitching together dance moves sent in by 85 of Coxon’s fans from 22 countries around the world, turning them into one composite dancer.

(via It’s Neat That via Photojojo)

Hovering Swarms of Random Objects

Photographer Thomas Jackson has an ongoing project titled Emergent Behavior that consists of surreal photographs of swarms of various things (e.g. leaves, plastic cups, ping pong balls) in various locations. The images aren’t computer generated, but are rather composite images combining a number of photographs — probably similar to the “flock of phones” tutorial that we featured a while back.
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Cross Photos Showing the First and Last Light of the Winter Solstice

Starting in 2001, photographer Mary Mattingly has created an image every year on the winter solstice — the day of the year when daylight is shortest — showing the first light of the day and the last light of the day blended into a single photo. The series is called “First Light / Last Light“.
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