Posts Tagged ‘competition’

Heineken Using an Instagram Scavenger Hunt to Give Away US Open Tickets

heinekeninstagram1

It’s not just Facebook that is eager to unleash the money-making capabilities of Instagram, many companies use the service regularly to connect with their clients and build a brand presence. Heineken’s recent Crack the US Open competition is a great example. Read more…

Humorous Video Pokes Fun at the Food Pic Fad

Professional food photography is a legitimate pursuit that takes some serious skill. It’s done in a studio, with professional lighting and often enlists the help of a professional food stylist to get the shot just right.

Food pics are a different matter, often taken in a restaurant with a cell phone while the other people at the table wait impatiently to dig in. The humorous clip above pokes fun at the latter. Read more…

Rapid-Fire Video Highlights the Beauty of Western Australia in 1001 Photos

Tourism Western Australia recently embarked on a $1.6 million ad campaign called 1001 Extraordinary Experiences. The campaign wanted to show just how gorgeous the state of Western Australia is by inviting people from all over the world to contribute photos they had taken there.

A total of 1001 entries came in, and the above compilation puts them all together in a one minute and forty second tour across the diverse landscape of this extraordinary region. Read more…

Time-Lapse of One of the World’s Largest Fireworks Competitions

Photographer Rob Whitworth has created a number of beautiful time-lapse videos that have received huge numbers of views online. This past April, Whitworth had the opportunity to take his skills to the city of Da Nang, Vietnam to document the Danang International Fireworks Competition 2013, one of the world’s “biggest and best” firework contests.
Read more…

Canon’s T5i Takes On Nikon’s D5200 in a Cringe-Worthy Drop Test

It’s one of a photographer’s worst fears: dropping your DSLR. Especially for the amateur who may not have a backup, knowing that your camera can withstand a beating has led to some interesting videos in the past.

But while we appreciate DigitalRev’s “paint it pink and light it on fire” approach, protection plan company SquareTrade‘s more scientific test is probably more useful (if less entertaining). In the video above, SquareTrade enlists the help of pro photographer and B&H employee Neil Gershman to drop test Canon’s T5i and Nikon’s D5200. Read more…

Nikon Photo Contest No Longer Accepts Photos Shot Using Film Cameras

Another sign of the times (and bad news for film-photography enthusiasts): one of the most prestigious photo competitions in the world no longer accepts film photographs. Earlier this week Nikon published a “call for entries” for its 34th Nikon Photo Contest. Here’s what the entry guidelines say about “Eligible Works”:

Image data files created with digital cameras (including medium- and large-format cameras). Images that have been retouched using software or by other means will be accepted. Both color and monochrome images will be accepted. (Scans of photographs taken with film cameras are not eligible.)

The contest has been held since 1969 to “provide an opportunity for photographers around the world to communicate and to enrich photographic culture for professionals and amateurs alike.”
Read more…

Photojournalist Uses iPhone to Cover Olympics

We’ve seen some very heavy-duty gear lugged out to cover the Olympic games in London this year: some robotic rigs, an 800mm lens that could easily weigh more than the average lady gymnast, and of course, the usual suspects in a packed camera bag. But Guardian photojournalist Dan Chung is traveling light: he’s covering the games with a simple iPhone setup.

Using different combinations of an iPhone 4s, a clip-on Schneider lens and a pair of Canon binoculars, Chung has been live-blogging all aspects of the games. His photos yield surprisingly crisp results, indoors, outdoors and even underwater through a viewing window — which again reinforces the old photographer’s adage that the best camera is the one that’s with you.

Chung uses the Snapseed app to do in-camera/phone edits. You can check out more of Chung’s work on his Guardian blog.

(via The Verge via dpreview)

200 Yards: A Photo Project Documenting SF Through a Hyperlocal Lens

200 Yards is a neat photo project based in San Francisco that centers around the idea of having photographers point cameras at a small section of a particular city. For each cycle, organizers pick a particular “alternative gallery space” and invite photographers to create photographs within a 200-yard radius of that location (this translates to roughly one block in each direction). Submissions are then whittled down until 12 photographers remain, and these artists are invited to the resulting exhibition at the gallery space.

200 Yards (via Photojojo)

World Press Photo of the Year 2012

This powerful photograph by photographer Samuel Aranda was introduced today as the World Press Photo of the Year 2012. The description reads,

A woman holds a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011.

The image was selected from 101,254 photos that were submitted to the World Press Photo 2012 competition by 5,247 photographers in 124 countries. You can check out all the other winners in the different categories on The Big Picture and over on the World Press Photo website.

How Much Beauty Can You Capture in One Second of Video?

The Beauty of a Second” is a short film competition asking people to capture “beauty”, but with a twist: each submitted video can only be one second long. Above is a compilation of entries submitted during the contest’s first round.

So how much beauty can be captured in just one second of footage? A whole lot — photography proves that.

The Beauty of a Second (via Boing Boing)