Posts Tagged ‘competition’

Canon’s T5i Takes On Nikon’s D5200 in a Cringe-Worthy Drop Test

It’s one of a photographer’s worst fears: dropping your DSLR. Especially for the amateur who may not have a backup, knowing that your camera can withstand a beating has led to some interesting videos in the past.

But while we appreciate DigitalRev’s “paint it pink and light it on fire” approach, protection plan company SquareTrade‘s more scientific test is probably more useful (if less entertaining). In the video above, SquareTrade enlists the help of pro photographer and B&H employee Neil Gershman to drop test Canon’s T5i and Nikon’s D5200. Read more…

Nikon Photo Contest No Longer Accepts Photos Shot Using Film Cameras

Another sign of the times (and bad news for film-photography enthusiasts): one of the most prestigious photo competitions in the world no longer accepts film photographs. Earlier this week Nikon published a “call for entries” for its 34th Nikon Photo Contest. Here’s what the entry guidelines say about “Eligible Works”:

Image data files created with digital cameras (including medium- and large-format cameras). Images that have been retouched using software or by other means will be accepted. Both color and monochrome images will be accepted. (Scans of photographs taken with film cameras are not eligible.)

The contest has been held since 1969 to “provide an opportunity for photographers around the world to communicate and to enrich photographic culture for professionals and amateurs alike.”
Read more…

Photojournalist Uses iPhone to Cover Olympics

We’ve seen some very heavy-duty gear lugged out to cover the Olympic games in London this year: some robotic rigs, an 800mm lens that could easily weigh more than the average lady gymnast, and of course, the usual suspects in a packed camera bag. But Guardian photojournalist Dan Chung is traveling light: he’s covering the games with a simple iPhone setup.

Using different combinations of an iPhone 4s, a clip-on Schneider lens and a pair of Canon binoculars, Chung has been live-blogging all aspects of the games. His photos yield surprisingly crisp results, indoors, outdoors and even underwater through a viewing window — which again reinforces the old photographer’s adage that the best camera is the one that’s with you.

Chung uses the Snapseed app to do in-camera/phone edits. You can check out more of Chung’s work on his Guardian blog.

(via The Verge via dpreview)

200 Yards: A Photo Project Documenting SF Through a Hyperlocal Lens

200 Yards is a neat photo project based in San Francisco that centers around the idea of having photographers point cameras at a small section of a particular city. For each cycle, organizers pick a particular “alternative gallery space” and invite photographers to create photographs within a 200-yard radius of that location (this translates to roughly one block in each direction). Submissions are then whittled down until 12 photographers remain, and these artists are invited to the resulting exhibition at the gallery space.

200 Yards (via Photojojo)

World Press Photo of the Year 2012

This powerful photograph by photographer Samuel Aranda was introduced today as the World Press Photo of the Year 2012. The description reads,

A woman holds a wounded relative in her arms, inside a mosque used as a field hospital by demonstrators against the rule of President Ali Abdullah Saleh, during clashes in Sanaa, Yemen on 15 October 2011.

The image was selected from 101,254 photos that were submitted to the World Press Photo 2012 competition by 5,247 photographers in 124 countries. You can check out all the other winners in the different categories on The Big Picture and over on the World Press Photo website.

How Much Beauty Can You Capture in One Second of Video?

The Beauty of a Second” is a short film competition asking people to capture “beauty”, but with a twist: each submitted video can only be one second long. Above is a compilation of entries submitted during the contest’s first round.

So how much beauty can be captured in just one second of footage? A whole lot — photography proves that.

The Beauty of a Second (via Boing Boing)

Google Launches Photo Contest to Find the “Stars of the Future”

In the first 100 days after Google+ was launched, 3.4 billion photographs were uploaded to the service. In light of this, Google is launching an international photo competition to “find the photography stars of the future.”

From far-away places to up-close faces, there are 10 different categories to spark your imagination. And there are some great prizes to be won: 10 finalists chosen by a jury of renowned photographers will show their work at Saatchi Gallery, London for two months in 2012 alongside Out of Focus, a major photography exhibition, and win a trip to London to attend the exhibition opening event with a friend. One winner will go on a once-in-a-lifetime trip to an amazing destination with a professional photography coach.

The contest is open to college students, and can be entered by uploading entries to Google+ and then submitting it through an online form. The deadline to enter is January 31, 2012.

Google Photography Prize (via Google)

Hallmark’s True Picture of Motherhood

Hallmark Cards recently held a photography competition in the UK called “The Picture of Motherhood”, inviting people to enter photographs that capture the essence of being a mother. After a nationwide search, an expert panel of judges has selected the above photograph, shot by Jenny Downing, as the winner. She comments,

I took this photo in India where I was working a few years ago, it depicts the natural instinct for a mother to protect her child. In the image she is putting a hat on her child to protect them from the sun. This encapsulates motherhood for me.

In addition to having her photograph featured on an upcoming Mother’s Day card by Hallmark, Downing will receive £1,000 worth of photography equipment.

(via Photo News Today)