Posts Tagged ‘colors’

Time-Lapse of Central Park in NYC Shows the Seasons Changing Over 6 Months

The amount of dedication required for the time-lapse video above is astounding. Titled “Fall,” it shows the colors of New York City’s Central Park changing with the seasons over a period of half a year. Here’s what its creator, photographer Jamie Scott, says about it:

One of the most striking things about New York City is the fall colors and there’s no better place to view this then Central Park. I chose 15 locations in the park and revisited them 2 days a week for six months, recording all camera positions and lens information to create consistency in the images. All shots were taken just after sunrise.

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Fascinating Facts About How Humans Perceive and React to Color

Unless you only shoot in monochrome, color likely plays a huge part in the experience of viewing your photographs. You may be aware of how you use them, but do you know how the colors in your images affect the people that look at them? PBS Off Book put out this fascinating video today that explores just how powerful colors are.
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Is Your Browser Color Managed?

Is your browser color managed? If not, the photographs you are looking at are distorted versions of what their creators intended them to be. Is the car above rendered in school bus yellow, or in a jarring purple?
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Nigo: Limited Edition Instant Film with Colorful Frames

The Impossible Project has partnered up with Japanese music producer and designer Nigo for a limited edition version of its PX 70 Color Shade Film. Instead of its traditional white frames or the newer black frames, the film comes in 10 different colors: yellow, orange, red, pink, lilac, dark blue, light blue, green, black and white. Each pack comes with eight frames with randomly selected colors and costs $25 over at The Impossible Project shop.

PX 70 Color Shade by Nigo Film Edition [Impossible Project]

Colorful Photographs Showing Uniformity

Mimicry” is a photo project by Dutch photographers Ilse Leenders and Maurits Gisen that’s based around the idea of uniformity. They write,

The inspiration of the series Mimicry came from the uniformity of the human beings. People from whom the identity is missing and those who are inconspicuous in our society. Just like animals they adapt to their environment. Visually in this series it is shown by the use of similar costumes, position and sex.

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Portraits of Little Girls and Boys with Their Pink and Blue Things

The Pink & Blue Project by South Korean photographer JeongMee Yoon started seven years ago after she photographed a portrait of her 5-year-old daughter sitting next to her beloved pink possessions. She then began creating portraits of other girls who loved pink things, and then other boys who loved blue.
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Optical Illusion: You’ll Want to Double Check This in Photoshop

We’ve shared a couple stories in the past month on how human eyes are very subjective and horrible as light meters, and here’s yet another mind-boggling example of how easily our eyes can be fooled by context. In the image above, the “blue” and the “green” stripes are exactly the same color.

(via Top Cultured)

Do People Always See the Same Things When They Look At Colors?

Update: It looks like the video was taken down by the uploader. Sorry guys.


Color is simply how our brains respond to different wavelengths of light, and wavelengths outside the spectrum of visible light are invisible and colorless to us simply because our eyes can’t detect them. Since colors are created in our brains, what if we all see colors differently from one another? BBC created a fascinating program called “Do You See What I See?” that explores this question, and the findings are pretty startling.
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How to Add Dramatic Colors to a Photo Using Adobe Camera Raw

Here’s a helpful tutorial by Tutvid that teaches how to give your photographs dramatic colors using only Adobe Camera Raw. If you’ve started shooting RAW but haven’t played around too much with ACR, this video is also a great primer for becoming familiar with the different panels and sliders.

(via Fotografia)

Canon Goes Colorful with the Rebel T3

We’re not sure how we missed this when the camera was announced at the beginning of last month, but the Canon Rebel T3 (AKA 1100D) will be available in four different colors when it lands on shelves next month. In addition to the standard black body — which some consumers might find intimidating — the camera (and matching straps) will also be available in red, brown, and metallic gray. Supposedly non-black versions will cost a bit more.

Perhaps this is the first step Canon is taking towards allowing the colors on entry-level DSLRs to be completely customized, like Pentax has been doing for some time now.