Posts Tagged ‘collaboration’

This Creative Video Project Only Reveals Its Secrets if You Photograph the Screen

Brian Matthew Hart has spent the better part of 9 years playing around with unique light drawing techniques. His latest project, Uncertainty, brings together the knowledge and inspiration he’s accumulated over those 9 years and packs them into one of the most abstracted and unique approaches to light painting we’ve ever come across. Read more…

Light Painting Meets CGI In This Incredible BTS Look at a Unique Collaboration

Showing just how productive and intuitive collaboration can be, Montreal-based photographer Eric Paré and Michigan-based digital artist Mike Campau got together to create some incredible work that takes advantage of their individual skill sets. Read more…

Collaborative Project Using Gas Masks to Draw Attention to Wet Plate Photography

gasmask

The Mask Series is a collaboration between wet plate photographers around the world who are trying to raise public awareness of the historical photographic process that they’re so passionate about. The whole thing is centered around a specific prop: a vintage Czech M10 gas mask. Basically, every photograph contributed to the project must somehow incorporate one of these gas masks in one way or another.
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People vs. Places: Double Exposures by Two Photographers on One Roll of Film

People vs. Places is a creative collaborative photo project by photographers Timothy Burkhart and Stephanie Bassos. They create double exposure photos by each shooting the same roll of film, but with a neat twist: they each stick to a theme:

This double exposure project allows us to step back from having full control of the image making process and trust in one another while allowing coincidences to happen naturally on film. Stephanie exposes a full roll of 35mm film of only “people,” and Timothy reloads the film again into the same camera, to imprint only “places” and locations to the same roll. These images are all the end result of our ongoing series and are unedited negatives straight from the camera.

Thus, each image shows a randomly created clash between a photo of a person and a photo of a place.
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JR and Liu Bolin Team Up for a Photo of JR Blending into a Photo of Liu Bolin

JR (the TED-winning photographer who uses giant photos as street art) and Liu Bolin (the Chinese artist who photographs himself blending into scenes) recently got together to collaborate on a photograph taken by Liu Bolin in which JR blends into one of his large scale installations. The giant photograph that Liu Bolin helped blend JR into is a photo of Liu Bolin’s eye, created by JR. Can you say “photo inception”?
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Canon Rumored to be Working with Apple

The blogosphere is abuzz today over a rumor that Canon and Apple may be planning to collaborate on an upcoming project. Craig over at Canon Rumors started it yesterday when he wrote,

I’ve received a few pieces of information about an upcoming collaboration between Apple and Canon. What that collaboration is hasn’t been spelled out to me. It could be with the upcoming Final Cut Pro 8, or maybe something more.

The story was soon picked up by blogs and magazines, with everyone trying to make guesses as to what the “secret project” might be (if there even is one). Hopefully it has to do with Aperture or something photography related, though the next version of Final Cut Pro is a likely candidate as well.


Image credit: Canon Laptop by Frank Kehren

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Facity Documents the Faces of Cities

Facity is an online photo project in which photographers from cities around the world submit portraits documenting faces found within their respective cities. The project, which started at the end of 2008 in Berlin, has grown to 88 photographers in 58 different cities, and currently publishes 10-15 new portraits per day.

Facity attempts to ensure a similar look across each submitted portrait by publishing aesthetic guidelines they call the FACITY manifest. These rules govern everything from lighting (indoor natural light) to equipment (50mm lens at f/2.8), and seem to be quite effective at standardizing the style of submitted portraits.

One thing we noticed was that Facity photographers have quite a knack for capturing brilliant expressions on the faces of babies:

If you’d like to participate, you can volunteer to be either a model or a photographer. The only requirement for being a model is that you need to live in a city that has a photographer, while volunteering as a photographer requires that you create at least one portrait per week for six months.