Posts Tagged ‘CMOS’

Sony Just Announced the World’s Highest Sensitivity CMOS Sensor, But It’s for Your Car

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Sony today announced the new IMX224MQV 1/3-inch 1.27MP CMOS sensor, which is said to have the world’s highest level of sensitivity for any sensor in its class. But before you get excited about that night vision point-and-shoot you’ve been wanting, you should know something: it was designed specifically for use in automobile cameras.

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New Leica S to be Announced at Photokina, Packs a 40-50MP CMOS Sensor & 4K Video

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From some talks with a Leica rep at the 2014 NAB show, it looks like Digipixelpop has found out that the next Leica S will be announced at Photokina in September. Packing a 40-50MP medium format CMOS sensor and 4K video, it’s an interesting addition to Leica’s current line-up, but one we probably should’ve seen coming considering PhaseOne, Pentax and Hasselblad have all already hopped on the CMOS medium format train. Read more…

Specs and Price Info for the Pentax 645D II CMOS Medium Format Camera from CP+

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We weren’t able to send anyone all the way to CP+ this year, and some of the products and details emerging from the trade show have us a little sad about that.

We already shared the news that Fuji will soon be debuting a 50mm tele conversion lens for the X100/s, and now we’ve got some specs and price information for the upcoming Pentax 645D CMOS Medium Format camera. Read more…

Pentax Announces Its Own CMOS Medium Format Camera, Will Show it Off at CP+

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So much for a medium format CMOS sensor being a novel idea. Following closely behind Hasseblad and Phase One‘s CMOS medium format announcements is the news that Ricoh is working on its own CMOS MF model, a followup to the 645D that is tentatively being called the Pentax 645D 2014. Read more…

Attention Camera Marketing Departments: Tell Me About the Sensor

Since its spec sheet leaked on Monday, there’s been plenty of buzz surrounding Pentax’s newly-released K-3 APS-C DSLR. Many are particularly atwitter about the K-3’s unique anti-aliasing system, which relies on a vibrating sensor to remove moire-effects. Because it’s not filter-based, the effect can be turned off.

Therefore, the K-3 offers the moire-eliminating effect of an anti-aliasing filter when it’s needed, and the greater sharpness of a filterless sensor when it’s not. Not only do people care about this innovation, but for many it was a cardinal feature of the camera. Read more…

Using a Camera’s Rolling Shutter Effect to Create a Display

I’ve got a few days before my big summer vacation, so I thought I’d hammer out an incredibly impractical display technology!
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DxOMark’s Leica M9 Sensor Test Results Have Leica Photographers Befuddled

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If you’re a fan of Leica’s digital rangefinders and have been skeptical of DxOMark’s ability to determine sensor quality through its rigorous tests, you might want to skip over the lab’s newly published test results on Leica’s M series sensors.
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What a DSLR’s CMOS Sensor Looks Like Under a Microscope

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Jack over at the astrophotography blog The Landingfield has published a series of photographs showing what a digital camera’s CMOS sensor looks like when viewed through a microscope. The sensor (seen above) was taken from a broken Nikon D2H — a DSLR from back in the early 2000s.
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“To Omit an Alias Filter… Is like Building a Sports Car with No Brakes”

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Last week, we pointed you to a piece by the New York Times on how Fujifilm is attempting to kill moiré without killing sharpness by designing its sensors in a way that eschews the traditional anti-aliasing filters used in digital cameras. Photographer Martin Doppelbauer disagrees with Fuji’s claims: he has published a piece arguing that, “digital cameras without aliasing filters are cameras with a built-in design flaw“:

To omit an alias filter in front of a digital image sensors is like building a sports car with no brakes. Of course, the car accelerates a little faster due to the lower weight and the cornering ability is also better due to the smaller unsprung weight – but ultimately it lacks an essential functional element.

For analog cameras, an alias filter is not required: ​​Film has no sharply defined limit of resolution. It loses contrast and resolution gradually with increasingly higher frequencies. You could say, the low-pass filter is already incorporated in the film itself.

[...] By omitting the alias filter, the recorded image information [...] does not increase! Even though images of cameras without aliasing filters may appear sharper and crisper: Images of cameras with a proper alias filter can easily be re-sharpened to achieve the same visual impression – without side effects.

So according to Doppelbauer, the recent fascination with removing anti-aliasing filters is more based in marketing rather than science.

Alias-filters: Yes or No? [Martin Doppelbauer]

Fujifilm’s Moiré-Killing X-Trans Sensor is a Throwback to the Days of Film

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Fujifilm’s new X-Trans sensors diverge from the traditional way CMOS sensors are designed by using an irregular pattern of red, green, and blue pixels. This allows the sensors to eschew the standard anti-aliasing filter, eliminating moiré patterns without putting an extra component in front of the sensor. Roy Furchgott over at The New York Times has an interesting piece on how the new tech is inspired by Fujifilm’s glory days in the film photography industry:

Old fashioned analog photographs didn’t get a moire pattern because the crystals in film and photo paper aren’t even in size and placement. That randomness breaks up the moire effect.

So Fuji built a new sensor employing what it knew from the film business. Instead of using the Bayer array, it created a pattern called the X-Trans sensor which lays out the red green and blue photo sensors in a way that simulates the randomness of analog film.

Furchgott does a good job of explaining the new sensor design (and its benefits) in an easy-to-understand way.

Old Technology Modernizes a Camera Sensor [NYTimes]