Posts Tagged ‘cloudsharing’

Dropbox Shuts Down Photo Storage Site Snapjoy Just 6 Months After Acquiring It

snapjoy1

Back in December, Dropbox acquired the photo storage service Snapjoy, seemingly getting ready to jump head first into the cloud sharing battle. At the time, the announcement on the Snapjoy blog rang with excitement, and even though they weren’t going to be accepting new signups, they promised that “your photos are safe!”

Well, not anymore. As of yesterday, Dropbox has officially decided to shut down the service — a decision that was confirmed by Snapjoy on its blog and through an email to all of its remaining subscribers. Read more…

Dropbox Acquires Snapjoy, Gearing Up for Cloud Photo Sharing War

snapdrop

In the world of cloud data storage, Dropbox is one of the 800lb gorillas fighting for your files. In recent days, it has been making big moves to become more of a player in photo storage and sharing. After all, everyone needs a safe place to keep their digital images, right?

The company’s latest play came today in the form of an acquisition: Dropbox has acquired fellow cloud-storage company Snapjoy — a business based around aggregating photos from around the web and from your various devices.
Read more…

Eye-Fi May Soon Launch Its Own Cloud Photo Sharing Service Called Circ

It seems like we’re saying this every week, but the cloud photo storage industry is becoming more and more packed. Heck, even AT&T launched its own service called Locker earlier this month. The next entrant to the arena looks like it will be a photography company we didn’t expect: wireless SD card maker Eye-Fi.
Read more…

Canon to Play the Cloud Photo Storage and Sharing Game with Project 1709

It’s not uncommon for camera manufacturers to launch their own online photo storage or sharing service, but Canon is looking to make a bigger splash than most. At Photokina last week, the company announced Project 1709, an upcoming cloud-based service that will allow photographers to store their entire library of photographs online. As with most cloud services, the images would then be available from anywhere in the world, accessible using any device (e.g. computer, tablet, smartphone, Internet-connected camera).
Read more…