Posts Tagged ‘celebrities’

Emma Stone & Andrew Garfield Creatively Turn the Paparazzi Into a Force for Good

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In the photography hierarchy, the paparazzi are considered by many to be the lowest of the low. Even when they get attacked by less-than-loved celebrities, the reaction from many of our readers is rarely sympathetic. But thanks to some creativity and quick thinking, actor couple Emma Stone and Andrew Garfield have managed to turn the pap into a force for charity. Read more…

Using a 20×24-inch Polaroid to Take Honest Portraits of Movie Stars

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Print of Robert De Niro just out of the camera (screen capture from the video ‘Up Close and Personal’)

Created by Polaroid in 1976, the 20×24-inch instant camera is one of the most unusual and massive pieces of photographic history you can get your hands on (if you’re lucky enough… or have the dough). Fortunately for those of you who want to see the cam in action, photographer Chuck Close managed to do just that in a series of images for Vanity Fair’s 20th Hollywood issue. Read more…

Celebrities Pose for Bacteriograph Portraits Made of their Own Bacteria at Big Bang Fair

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We first introduced you to scientist and photographer Zachary Copfer’s ‘bacteriographs’ back in 2012. A technique that he invented and, as far as we know, only he uses, Bacteriography uses the subject’s own bacteria to ‘grow’ a portrait of them on a petri dish.

Earlier this month, Copfer brought his signature technique to the UK for the first time ever in order to photograph several British celebrities at the UK’s Big Bang Fair. Read more…

Masterful Mashups Reveal How Similar the Celebrities of Today are to the Stars of Old

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It turns out the rich, famous and powerful of today bear a striking resemblance to the rich, famous and powerful of yesteryear — at least if you trust the photo series Iconatomy by George Chamoun and the followup series Then & Now by Marc Ghali. Read more…

Anti-Photography Patent Shows a Device that Will Spoil a Paparazzo’s Day

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There are those who don’t mind being photographed, those who do, and those who are photographed so often they can’t help but mind. Celebrities in particular must deal with an onslaught of photography every time they leave their home, and inventors Wilbert Leon Smith, Jr. and Keelo Lamance Jackson want to do something to help.

That’s why they invented a new anti-photography photo-ruining device that may wind up putting the paparazzi out of work. Read more…

Silly ‘Shopped Photos Show Regular Guy Getting Cozy With A-List Celebrities

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Self-taught Photoshop hobbyist Patrick Thorendahl has an interesting pastime that has gotten him a lot of media attention as of late: he likes to ‘shop himself into photos of A-list celebrities. The resulting shots have gone viral and earned him some 50,000+ followers on Instagram. Read more…

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Playing Around with Average Faces Using Martin Schoeller’s Celebrity Portraits

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Yesterday, PetaPixel shared photographer Richard Prince’s composite portrat created by blending together 57 faces of girlfriends seen on Seinfeld. I also enjoy playing with the idea of image averaging, and can’t get enough of it. Late last year, I started experimenting with the idea of averaging faces by blending portraits.

I needed a set of faces that were all semi-similar enough to create good averages with. Well, if you haven’t seen the work of photographer Martin Schoeller, you are missing out! He has a series of close-ups that are shot with very similar lighting styles and compositions of famous (and not-so-famous) people. It’s simply mesmerizing to see. I grabbed the shots above to try face averaging out with.
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Instagram May Soon Turn Paparazzi Into an Endangered Species

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In recent years, photographers — and particularly photojournalists — have had to compete more and more aggressively with the everyday Joe and his smartphone who happens to be at the right place at the right time. And with technologies like CrowdOptic in the works that will help sift through the plethora of photographs taken every second, news agencies may soon be able to find that Joe in record time.

But according to an article by Jenna Wortham of The New York Times, one branch of photography is already taking a significant hit: the paparazzi are being replaced by Instagrammers. Using a recent photo of Beyoncé and her daughter as an example, Wortham shows how the paparazzi are already losing their battler with those same amateurs. Read more…

Brian Bowen Smith on Trusting Your Gut and the Creative Process

Photographer Brian Bowen Smith learned his craft at the feet of legendary shooter Herb Ritts; and now, many years and many star-studded photo shoots later, he’s sharing some of his wisdom with the rest of us as part of Chicago Ideas Week.

In the above video, he uses three photo shoots to exemplify the versatility and creativity required to be one of the best. From Hillary Swank in a studio, to Matthew Fox in an airplane hangar, to Gabrielle Union on the beach, each shoot exemplifies a different lesson that Smith hopes you’ll walk away with. Read more…

Photos Showing News Makers Thrusting Individuals Into the National Spotlight

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In the early 2000s, NYC-based photographer Christopher Dawson noticed that even though major events were going on around the world, major news organizations in the US often remained fixed on stories involving the rich and famous. Due to the fact that stories involving celebrities often result in more eyeballs and advertising dollars, things like Britney Spears’ custody hearing or Michael Jackson’s molestation trial would attract a disproportionate amount of attention.

Starting 2004, Dawson began to create a series of photos with the camera pointed at the newsmakers rather than the stories. The ongoing project is titled “Coverage.”
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