Posts Tagged ‘cardboard’

How to Scan Film Using Your Ordinary Flatbed Scanner

If you’ve tried to scan film using an ordinary flatbed scanner as you would a piece of paper, you’ve probably discovered that it didn’t turn out very well. The reason is because film needs to be illuminated from behind, while conventional scanners capture light that’s reflected off what they’re scanning. Before you give up hope and shell out money for a film scanner, here’s some good news: you can build a cheap and simple cardboard adapter that turns any scanner into a film scanner!
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Giving Away Sharan Cardboard Cameras

Update: This giveaway is now over. The winner was randomly selected and announced below.


This week we’re doing a smaller giveaway just for fun, but the prize can only be shipped to addresses in the US (sorry international readers!). We’re giving away the two Sharan cardboard pinhole camera kits that we featured here a while back. The Std-35e shoots normal 35mm images and is worth $25, while the Wide-35 does panoramic photos.

To enter this giveaway, all you need to do is:

Link us to a favorite photo of yours taken in 2011

There are two ways to enter, and doing both methods will give you 2 entries in the contest, and thus double the chance the win!

  1. Leave your response as a comment on this post
  2. Tweet your response, and include the following link to this post anywhere in the tweet: http://j.mp/sharan

    As long as the link appears in the tweet, you’ll be automatically entered in the contest.

This contest will end Sunday, April 2, 2011. We’ll randomly pick a winner using random.org and update this post. Good luck!


Update: This giveaway is now over. We received 31 comment entries and 17 Tweet entries for 48 entries overall. The randomly selected winners are…

#2: John Dunahoo (STD-35e)

one of my favorite photos… Orlando, FL

#24: Michael Wilson (Wide-35)

Recent HDR photo of Goldwater Lake in Prescott, AZ

Please email [email protected] to claim your prize (we’re contacting you as well).

Thanks to everyone who entered! Please stay tuned for more awesome giveaways!


A big thanks to Brooklyn5and10 for providing the prize for this giveaway!

Build Your Own Working Cardboard Hasselblad Pinhole Camera

You can now build you own version of the cardboard Hasselblad pinhole camera that we featured a couple days ago. Kelly Angood has released a PDF with the template and detailed instructions for putting the pieces together. The finished product is a working pinhole camera that takes 120 35mm film.
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Cardboard Hasselblad Pinhole Camera

Designer Kelly Angood created this cardboard pinhole camera that looks exactly like a Hasselblad medium format camera. The design is screen printed onto the cardboard, and the camera accepts 120 film. See sample photographs shot with this camera over on Angood’s website.

Pinhole Hasselblad (via Make)


Update: Angood published a PDF with templates and instructions for those of you who want to make your own.

Cardboard USB Sticks Perfect for Sharing Photos with Friends

The Flashkus by Art Lebedev is a cheap, disposable, and environmentally friendly cardboard USB stick that might one day make sharing event photos with friends much easier and cheaper. While many websites are geared towards photo sharing, transferring gigabytes of data to friends is still difficult to do via the Interwebs, so people often choose to burn DVDs or use pricey USB drives. The Flashkus would make the process easier by allowing people to simply tear off a USB drive, dump photos onto it, scribble a note onto the front, and hand it off to their friends. Once the photos are downloaded, the drive can be reused or thrown away.

It’ll be available in 4GB, 8GB, and 16GB but currently seems to be in the concept/design stage. Hopefully Art Lebedev adds it to their online store soon.

Flashkus (via Wired)

Sharan Cardboard Pinhole Camera Kits

Sharan pinhole cameras are Japanese-made cardboard camera kits that you buy and build yourself. All the parts are pre-cut, and can be assembled using tape in about 1 to 2 hours with the help of step-by-step instructions. The STD35 is a standard 35mm pinhole camera, while the Wide-35 allows you to take panoramic photos.
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Concept Cardboard Pinhole Camera Shoots Instant Photos

The “Flutter in Pinhole” is a beautiful concept camera that combines a cardboard pinhole camera with instant film to make sharing memories a breeze, and could be the high-tech postcard of the future.
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Building a Twin Lens Reflex Camera Out of Cardboard

Last month we shared some of Kiel Johnson‘s amazing cardboard camera creations, and now here’s a behind-the-scenes video showing how one of them (a twin lens reflex camera) was made. Kiel uses only three materials: cardboard, tape, and glue. I had no idea the cameras were so massive, since the photos he takes of them don’t show any indication of scale.

(via Virtual Photography Studio)


P.S. On an unrelated note, supposedly the above video is designed to be viewable on iPads and iPhones. Let us know if you’re on one of these devices and you can see the video!

Use Cardboard Cutouts to Spell Out Upside-Down Shadow Words

Here’s a creative idea that we love – cut out giant letters, gather up some friends, and spell out words with shadows! Justin Swindle, a student at Brooks Institute of Photography in Santa Barbara, created the above image by cutting the sides off the biggest cardboard moving box he could get his hands on. He then traded the letters freehand and cut them out using a razor.

(via Photojojo)


Image credit: Love by CWYNDLE and used with permission

Cardboard Cameras by Kiel Johnson

Kiel Johnson is an American sculptor and painter that creates a lot of his work using cardboard. Among his works are a collection of cardboard cameras that are extremely realistic (given that they’re cardboard, of course). Now all he needs to do is team up with some brilliant engineer that can help him figure out how to have these awesome things actually make photos.
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