Posts Tagged ‘camerawork’

Beautiful Firework Photographs Captured Using Clever Camera Techniques

Yokohama Fireworks PP-8

Firework photographs are generally pretty uniform in their appearance: a dark sky, glowing sparks that are either points or lines depending on exposure time, and perhaps some views of the surrounding area. When photographing a major fireworks show last week, photographer Rob Shaw of BackFromLeave Photo wanted to do something different. He played around with various camera techniques and captured a set of firework images that is quite different than most of the images you’ll see online.
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Incredibly Difficult Steadicam Shot From the End of the Movie “Hugo”

Over the last couple of weeks we’ve featured two very impressive cinematography shots, one from the movie “Contact” and another from “Sucker Punch.” But while both of those required planning, expertise and, for one of them, some help from the digital age, the final steadicam shot from the movie “Hugo” is impressive in an entirely different way.

It’s not generated by a computer, and it’s not a shot that you might take any notice of when you watch the movie. What it is, however, is a testament to phenomenal camera work, because the whole thing is comprised of one long and very difficult shot that had Larry McConkey sighing in relief when it was over. This video offers a behind the scenes look at that shot from start to finish.

(via Fstoppers)

Mind-Bending Mirror Scene from the Movie “Sucker Punch”

If you liked the the “impossible shot” from the film Contact that we shared earlier this week, you’ll enjoy this clip as well. It’s a shot from the film Sucker Punch that uses some clever camera work and trickery rather than CGI to create its mind-bending effect. Interestingly enough, both this clip and the Contact one feature actress Jena Malone (albeit at different ages).


Thanks for the tips PupaChrysalis and traeger23!

A Mind-Blowing Impossible Shot from the Movie ‘Contact’

This has to do with filmmaking rather than photography, but check out this jaw-dropping shot from the 1997 movie Contact. Can you figure out how it was created? Here’s the answer.

Camera Work: The “Most Beautiful of All Photographic Magazines”

Between 1903 and 1917, photographer Alfred Stieglitz published a quarterly photographic journal called Camera Work featuring the work of important photographers around the world and promoting photography as an art form. Called “the most beautiful of all photographic magazines”, 50 issues containing 473 photographs were published before Stieglitz could no longer afford to continue the publication. Individual issues now sell for thousands of dollars each, but you can view the entire collection of photos for free over at Photogravure.


Thanks for the tip, Felix!