Posts Tagged ‘cameraobscura’

Wet Plate Photography with a Giant Van Camera

Los Angeles-based photographer Ian Ruhter creates amazing photographs using a van that he turned into a gigantic camera. He uses the collodion process (AKA wet plate photography) to turn large sheets of metal into photographs, and spends upwards of $500 making each giant one-of-a-kind print.
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Camera Obscura Kit For Setting Up Your Own Room-Sized Camera

Want to turn your room into giant camera obscura? Photographer Justin Quinnell (whose work we featured back in June) has created a Camera Obscura Kit that makes the conversion easy. Each kit contains a projection lens, a mount template, velcro tape, a projection sheet, and a handheld screen. They cost £25 apiece over on Quinnell’s website.

Camera Obscura Kit (via phototuts+)

How to Turn Your Room into a Giant Camera Obscura

National Geographic created this nifty little video teaching how to turn any room with a view into a giant camera obscura. For an even more challenging project, you can try setting up some photo-sensitive paper (either photo paper or paper you paint with emulsion yourself) on the wall to shoot giant photos with your giant camera obscura.

(via Foto Actualidad)

Roaming Camera Obscura Trailer Holds Photo Workshops in Luxembourg

Meet the Roulot’ographe, a Luxembourg-based mobile trailer that doubles as both a giant camera obscura and a photography workshop classroom. All the mobile studio needs is an electrical connection and access to running water.

roulot’ographe (via Gizmodo)

Giant Camera Overlooking the Pacific Ocean in San Francisco

If you’re ever in beautiful San Francisco, you might want to pay a visit to the Camera Obscura, a room sized “camera” built in 1946 and based on a 15th century design by Leonardo da Vinci. It’s designed to look like someone left a giant 35mm there with its lens pointed to the sky. The 10-inch mirror on top of the camera rotates 360 degrees, beaming a view of the area magnified by seven times onto a six foot parabolic table inside. In 2001, the Camera Obscura was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
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