Posts Tagged ‘camerabag’

Accessorize From the Hip with the New Spider Monkey by Spider Holster

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Spider Camera Holster just announced its newest addition to the holster family. Unveiled at WPPI Las Vegas, the company’s new Spider Monkey does for accessories what the SpiderPro or Black Widow Kit does for your SLR — it keeps them instantly accessible on your hip at all times. Read more…

Honest Couple Finds and Returns Camera Bag with Gear and $11,000 Cash

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A couple were visiting a vista point near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco this past Valentine’s Day when they came across a black camera bag that had apparently been misplaced. After the owner didn’t turn up to recover it, they looked inside and found a wallet with Chinese currency, credit cards, an “expensive-looking” camera and lens… and $11,000 in cash.
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How to Turn Your Satchel Bag into a DIY Camera Bag

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Turning a retro satchel bag into a real photographer’s bag is quite easy. All you need is an old camera bag (e.g. a LowePro one) with velcro inserts, scissors, super glue, sticky velcro stripes and, of course, time.
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DIY: Make a Waxed Canvas Camera Bag on the Cheap

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Looking to put together a sexy camera bag? Already have a messenger bag you want to carry your camera in? Love the look and feel of waxed canvas bags but don’t want to fork over the money to buy one new? This tutorial is for you!
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A Peek Inside the Camera Bag of a Getty Photographer at the Olympics

What would you pack in your camera bag to shoot the biggest sporting event in the world? PopPhoto has a great interview with Getty photographer Streeter Lecka in which he talks about preparing for (and shooting) the Olympics in London. His daily-basis kit includes two Canon 1D Xs, a 400mm f/2.8, two 70-200mm (f/2.8 and f/4), a 16-35mm f/2.8, and a 15mm fisheye. Here’s how his images are beamed to headquarters:

Getty has our own lines that are hardwired into every single event. Our tech crew came over months before to get an idea of where we’d be shooting. We can just plug in and send from there. The editors are in the media center where they can send it out immediately.

I have a backpack everyday with a computer and a card reader. When I plug it into the wire, push in the card, and press start, it automatically sends everything to the editors. Everything transfers to my computer as well. I also bring a separate little hard drive so I can back up everything I shoot for myself. If I want an original RAW file, I can get it if I want to.

Lecka says he expects to snap 2,000-4,000 photos a day on average.

Shooting The Olympics: Inside The Camera Bag Of Getty Photographer Streeter Lecka [PopPhoto]

The Camera Cooler: A Camera Bag That Can Also Keep Your Drinks Cold

Yesterday was the first day of summer, so it’s only right that we would run across a product that is equal parts camera bag and cooler. The Camera Cooler, by camping equipment company Poler, combines the usefulness of a cooler and the looks/functionality of a camera bag into one multi-purpose product. Read more…

Make Your Own Rolling Camera Bag for $30 Using Padded Inserts

Camera bags can get pricy, and when it comes to camera bags that travel well (i.e. on wheels) prices can really skyrocket. In fact, if you type “Rolling Camera Bag” into Amazon your first three options will run you $262.54, $171.07, and $249.00.

So if your idea of prepping for a vacation with your camera doesn’t include a hefty bag budget, Jerrit Pruyn over at FStoppers has a great solution: take your ordinary rolling carry-on bag, buy a matching Calumet Padded Insert for about $30, and put the two together. The result is pretty indistinguishable from some of the rolling camera bags you’ll find on the market.

DIY $30 Rolling Camera Bag (via Gizmodo)

Make a Retrotastic Camera-Shaped Bag

Berene Campbell of Happy Sew Lucky has a nifty cut-and-sew fabric design that lets you make a camera bag that looks like a Diana camera of the sixties:

This retro design is inspired by the Diana camera sold in the 60’s – now a funky collector’s item. (They sell replicas these days, for those into lomography.) The bag holds a camera up to 5″ W x 3.25″ H x 2″ D. It includes a strap. Of course it could just be a funky purse for your lipstick, loot and lollies too. One fat quarter of Upholstery weight Twill makes one camera bag.

You can purchase the fabric from Spoonflower, and follow a tutorial Campbell wrote over on her blog.

Retrotastic Camera Camera Bag Tutorial (via KEH)

TrekPak Camera Bag Insert Adjusts with Pins Rather Than Velcro

TrekPak is a new padded camera bag insert that does away with the annoyances of velcro by introducing a new pin system for adjusting dividers:

What makes TrekPak really unique, is that you won’t find any Velcro. When you try to adjust a normal gear bag while out in the field, you know how frustrating it can be. The Velcro sticks where you don’t want it to, is hard to pull apart, and just looks messy and cluttered. Our patent pending system uses anodized aluminum pins and durable padded dividers to offer limitless organizational options. The TrekPak pin system is much easier to adjust, very secure, and straight up, it’s slick.

They’re starting with inserts for Pelican camera bags, but are planning to release generic inserts and inserts designed for other bags as well.
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A Glimpse Inside the Camera Bag of a War Photographer

What would you pack if you were assigned to cover a war from the inside? The photo above shows what photographer Umit Bektas decided to pack in his camera bag for his embed with a US military unit in Afghanistan.

I was going to need two cameras but to be on the safe side, I took a third. As I was planning to do a multimedia piece as well, I packed an audio-recorder and GoPro Camera too. Also a Bgan to give me the internet access necessary to transmit my photos and the Thuraya to ensure communication at all events. As I placed my laptop in its bag, I thought “what if it breaks down” and added a nine-inch backup laptop too. Also packed was one spare battery for each piece of equipment that ran on them. For my cameras though, I took two spares each. As I would not be able to carry large lenses, I packed a converter, chargers, cables, memory cards, cleaning kits and adapters. All this filled up my largest bag.

Also in one of his bags was body armor and a helmet: a requirement for being embedded.

Are you ready for your embed? (via PopPhoto)


Image credits: Photograph by Umit Bektas/Reuters