Posts Tagged ‘building’

Jay Maisel’s Iconic NYC 190 Bowery Building Reportedly Up For Sale

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Photographer Jay Maisel has spent the past five decades living, working and exhibiting his work in the iconic building at 190 Bowery in Manhattan that he calls home. A home which, according to a report by Crain’s, is up for sale on RFR Realty. Details, however, are scarce as both Maisel and RFR are keeping pretty quiet. Read more…

This Camera-Shaped Building Isn’t Quite What You’d Expect It To Be

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Every so often, something comes across our desks that makes us do a bit of a double-take. This was one of those moments.

What you see above is a building shaped like a compact camera. What is the building used for? That’s where it gets interesting. It’s not a camera store or an electronics repair shop, it’s a public restroom… seriously. Read more…

What Can a Building Teach a Photographer, Six Months Spent Photographing the PDC

In a world dominated by too many photos and too little photography, one of the pieces of advice we stumble across fairly often from masters of this craft is to simply “slow down.” Andy Romanoff is one such master, and his project “Seeing the PDC” — for which he spent 6 months photographing the Pacific Design Center in LA — is a testament to slowing down and really seeing what it is you’re trying to capture. Read more…

Painting a Large College Dormitory with Light for a Nighttime Photograph

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I had the opportunity to photograph the newest dormitory on the Florida International University campus a couple of nights ago and I thought I would share a little insight on the process of lighting such a large structure.
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Time-Lapse Shows World’s Largest Ship Being Built in 50,000 Photos

This time-lapse video shows the building of the largest ship in the world. It’s the first Maersk Line Triple-E vessel, which was constructed at the DSME shipyard in Okpo, Korea. The video shows three months of time, and consists of 50,000 photographs taken during that period.
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Mesmerizing Stop-Motion Animation of a Building Uses Its Windows as Pixels

Swiss artist Guillaume Reymond of NOTsoNOISY created this amazing stop-motion animation titled “Animated Tower.” He found students and staff volunteers to turn an 11-story-building at the University of Health Sciences (HESAV) in Switzerland into a giant 10 by 11 display, with each window serving as a single pixel.
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Time-Lapse Shows Eight Years of 1 WTC Construction in Just Two Minutes

Yesterday One World Trade Center officially became the tallest building in New York City. Since 2004, the EarthCam network has had cameras pointed at the construction site, documenting its progress. Taking images captured over the past eight years, the website created the mesmerizing time-lapse video above that shows eight years of construction in just two minutes.

The Associated Press also created its own time-lapse video showing construction from October 2010 to April 2012.

Aerial Interior Photo of a Building Created by Stitching Hundreds of Photos

Architectural photographer Brett Beyer was recently commissioned by Cornell University to make a photograph of the interior of its recently completed Milstein Hall. The request wasn’t for a standard interior photo, but for an aerial shot of the 25,000-square-foot studio space that looked as if you were looking down at it with the roof removed (think Google Earth but for the interior of a building). Beyer accomplished this by pointing his Canon 5D Mark II and 17-40mm lens down from the ceiling on a 12-foot boom and then capturing 250 separate photographs of every square inch of the space over three days. He then spent 10 days stitching the images together by hand in Photoshop to create the amazing photo seen above.
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Building a Twin Lens Reflex Camera Out of Cardboard

Last month we shared some of Kiel Johnson‘s amazing cardboard camera creations, and now here’s a behind-the-scenes video showing how one of them (a twin lens reflex camera) was made. Kiel uses only three materials: cardboard, tape, and glue. I had no idea the cameras were so massive, since the photos he takes of them don’t show any indication of scale.

(via Virtual Photography Studio)


P.S. On an unrelated note, supposedly the above video is designed to be viewable on iPads and iPhones. Let us know if you’re on one of these devices and you can see the video!