Posts Tagged ‘brand’

C&A Marketing Buys Out Calumet Brand, Bringing Back a Few Entities

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It came as quite a surprise to everyone – including their own employees – when Calumet camera stores went out of business quite literally overnight. As is to be expected in such a downfall, much of their capital has been sold off in hopes to gain back as much as possible. But, as much as anything else, the fall of Calumet has left people wondering what will happen to the brand that many photographers came to know and trust.
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Brand Licensing and the Nikon Phone

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By this point, the crippling blow dealt to compact cameras by the rise of smartphones is old news, but camera manufacturers are now mounting counterattacks. They’ve certainly suffered for long enough. Sales for compact cameras fell by 30% in 2011 alone, and kept on falling. They’re at 102 million units for this year, compared to 144 million units just three years ago. Read more…

Personally Branded Product Photos Take a Swipe at the Selfie Generation

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If you live in New York City, one of these days you might just stumble upon a bottle of Aunt JeMichael instead of Aunt Jemima while shopping for syrup in the supermarket. No, it’s not a strange off-brand that somehow got mixed in with the big-name stuff, it’s part of advertising and fine art photographer Mike Mellia’s Self-Absorbed series. Read more…

Leica Cameras Are Growing as a Status Symbol Among Celebrities

Wealthy people who want to flaunt their wealth are attracted to shiny and pricey things. It’s no surprise then, that more and more Hollywood celebrities are gravitating toward one particular brand for their photographic needs: Leica. Alex Williams of The New York Times writes that the stars aren’t simply adopting the revered marque — some are learning how to use it too:

“If celebrities are going to be seen with a camera, for better or for worse, Leica does lend a certain cachet,” said Michael Holve [...] “It seems a Canon or Nikon is somehow bourgeois, or even pedestrian, by comparison.”

The swelling ranks of famous M-system devotees reach beyond those with a well-chronicled affection for the camera, like Brad Pitt. In recent years, Daniel Craig, Jude Law, Louis C. K., Miley Cyrus and many other celebrities have popped up in paparazzi shots toting Leicas.

[...] It is easy for cynics to sniff, but many Leica-toting celebrities take their photography seriously. Brendan Fraser, an aficionado, has had his work featured in the prestigious Leica Gallery in New York. And Mr. Pitt, who has appeared on the cover of Interview magazine holding a Leica M7, earns praise from photographers in Leica forums for his work, including a cover shoot of Angelina Jolie for W a few years ago.

Williams also makes the observation that the camera’s minimal features and manual controls naturally divide the celebrity owners into serious photo enthusiasts and posers.

Click if You Can Afford It [New York Times]

The Emperor’s New Gadget: Behold the Effect of Fanboyism on Consumers

Marketing and customer loyalty are two powerful things. They can make minor improvements in gadgets seem great, and major advancements to-die-for. In the world of photography, many camera owners feel strong allegiances to the brand they use, fiercely defending it as their own, and even going on the offensive to belittle other photographers who shoot under a different banner. This kind of customer loyalty does strange things to how the “fanboys” perceive the quality of their camera gear.
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Polaroid Brand Name Soon to Be Found on All Kinds of Random Gadgets

Polaroid the company was named after the inexpensive polarizing film developed by founder Edwin Land back in 1929. Over the years it became an iconic brand name associated with easy-to-use cameras and instant photos. After the company went bankrupt in the early 2000s, the brand name was sold off to a holdings company, which began licensing the name to third parties.

Up until now, the brand name has been used for mostly photography-related products, but that’s set to change: Polaroid has partnered with British retail chain Asda — owned by Wal-Mart — to branch into other electronics, including televisions and media players. The gadgets will hit store Asda shelves by the end of the month.

(via Pocket-lint)

MIOPS: Smartphone Controllable High Speed Camera Trigger

MIOPS is a new smartphone-controlled camera trigger that combines all of the features photographers want in a high-speed camera trigger into one convenient device.

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Household Objects with Visual Branding Completely Removed

Brand Spirit is a new photo project by NYC-based branding strategist Andrew Miller, who writes,

Every day for 100 days, I will paint one branded object white, removing all visual branding, reducing the object to its purest form. Each object may be purchased for less than $10, something I own, something another person gives me, or something I find.

See if you can identify each of the objects despite their lack of branding.
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Would Olympus Offload Its Struggling Camera Business?

Reuters is reporting that US-based investment firm TPG Capital has expressed interest in pouring $1 billion into Olympus in a joint deal, and has notified other possible suitors including Sony, Canon, Fujifilm, and Panasonic.

Nearly all of Olympus’ profits are generated from its dominant 70 percent share of the global market for flexible diagnostic endoscopes. The steady cash flow from that business has allowed it to prop up its digital camera business, which is on course to lose money for a second straight year.

TPG would consider taking over the other less desirable parts of the firm to facilitate a deal. This could include the digital camera operation, which is in need of a major overhaul, including job cuts, the person said.

It’s interesting that the camera division is one of the “less desirable parts” of Olympus, since that’s what most consumers know the company for.

TPG willing to invest $1 billion in Olympus [Reuters]


Image credit: OLYMPUS E-P1 by DORONKO

Why the Kodak Brand Can Live Past a Kodak Bankruptcy

CNNMoney has an interesting article on how the Kodak brand will likely survive even if the company itself declares bankruptcy:

Many potential buyers are also weighing the value of Kodak’s brand-name since there’s been a lot of talk that it may consider filing for bankruptcy. For now the company plans to restructure out of court.

Kodak’s brand name (not its patents) could easily generate more than double Polaroid’s sales price, said Jamie Salter, the CEO of Authentic Brands. “There are a lot of categories that Kodak could attach its name to. People would feel very comfortable using Kodak paper,” said Salter.

Like Polaroid, Kodak has brand cache all over the world offering potential buyers the opportunity to tap global markets.

The Polaroid brand name sold for $88 million in 2009 after Polaroid the company declared bankruptcy in 2008.

Why bankruptcy isn’t a brand killer [CNNMoney]


Image credit: Kodak Tri-X Pan 400 by Rubin 110

Is This the End of Olympus Cameras?

Olympus has been in the photography game since introducing its first camera back in 1936, but its future as a major player is at risk now that the company is caught up in one of the largest corporate scandals Japan has ever seen. According to Reuters, the company is reviewing its business structure, and there is speculation that it may be forced to sell off assets to survive.

While the company may be best known for its cameras, its actually built around a $2.6 billion endoscope business, of which it virtually holds a worldwide monopoly. Its camera business, on the other hand, is operating at a loss. According to investment bankers, other camera manufacturers are following the Olympus saga closely, but will likely hold off on making a move until things clear up more.

Olympus to review business structure amid scandal (via 43 Rumors)


Image credit: Olympus OM-30 SLR camera (OM-F) by csaveanu