Posts Tagged ‘brain’

Flashed Face Distortion Effect Makes Ordinary Portraits Look Hideous

If you ever create a slideshow of portraits, you might want to avoid showing them aligned side-by-side with a gap in between. The video above shows a crazy optical illusion that researchers have dubbed the “Flashed Face Distortion Effect”. By flashing ordinary portraits aligned at the eyes, the human brain begins to compare and exaggerate the differences, causing the faces to seem hideous and ogre-like. Researcher Matthew Thompson writes,

Like many interesting scientific discoveries, this one was an accident. Sean Murphy, an undergraduate student, was working alone in the lab on a set of faces for one of his experiments. He aligned a set of faces at the eyes and started to skim through them. After a few seconds, he noticed that some of the faces began to appear highly deformed and grotesque. He looked at the especially ugly faces individually, but each of them appeared normal or even attractive.

Read more…

Process This Negative With Your Brain

Here’s something that’ll blow your mind (sorry that it’s an ad): stare at the colored dots on this girl’s nose for 30 seconds, then quickly look at a white wall or ceiling (or anything pure white) and start blinking rapidly. Congratulations, you just processed a negative with your brain!

(via eject via Rob Sheridan)


P.S. Next time you’re in the photo lab, try doing this trick with your loupe and lightbox to save yourself some test prints.

Human Camera: Scientists Reconstruct Pictures from Brain Activity

We’re now one step closer to being able to take photographs with our minds. Scientists at UC Berkeley have come up with a way to reconstruct what the human brain sees:

[Subjects] watched two separate sets of Hollywood movie trailers

[...] brain activity recorded while subjects viewed the first set of clips was fed into a computer program that learned, second by second, to associate visual patterns in the movie with the corresponding brain activity.

Brain activity evoked by the second set of clips was used to test the movie reconstruction algorithm. This was done by feeding 18 million seconds of random YouTube videos into the computer program so that it could predict the brain activity that each film clip would most likely evoke in each subject.

Finally, the 100 clips that the computer program decided were most similar to the clip that the subject had probably seen were merged to produce a blurry yet continuous reconstruction of the original movie. [#]

Unlike the cat brain research video we shared a while back, the resulting imagery in this project isn’t directly generated from brain signals but is instead reconstructed from YouTube clips similar to what the person is thinking. They’re still calling it a “major leap toward reconstructing internal imagery” though. In the future this technology might be used to record not just our visual memories, but even our dreams!

(via Berkeley via Gizmodo)

Do People Always See the Same Things When They Look At Colors?

Update: It looks like the video was taken down by the uploader. Sorry guys.


Color is simply how our brains respond to different wavelengths of light, and wavelengths outside the spectrum of visible light are invisible and colorless to us simply because our eyes can’t detect them. Since colors are created in our brains, what if we all see colors differently from one another? BBC created a fascinating program called “Do You See What I See?” that explores this question, and the findings are pretty startling.
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11 Munny Makers’ Photos We Love

Toymaker Kid Robot has a line of DIY toys called MUNNYs. They’re pretty much cute humanoid-looking blobs that can be drawn, painted, and customized.

There are a couple of fun Flickr groups dedicated to these decorated darlings. We found some gems that deserve some love and attention–photographing a MUNNY can get a little funny. It’s like photographing artwork, a product, and an environmental portrait, all in one!

Here are some of our faves:

CMYKCMYK Munny Series by Connor Keller | fourtysixtyphoto.com

A clever nod to color modes, this CMYK Munny is simple but vibrantly sweet.

gorilla munnyGorilla Munny by Aiden O’Sullivan

Flickr photog Aiden O’Sullivan captured this fierce Gorilla Munny in his natural environment.

cavalerajpgMunny Calavera by Kitt Walker

We’ve never seen such a suave skeleton. This Munny was inspired by the Grim Fandango PC game character, Munny Calavera.

3255974082_758e112509Custom “Brain” Mini Munny by Aidan O’Sullivan

Munny AND brains, you say? This Munny is a little creepy, and brings to mind (haha) Syler from Heroes. Or Hannibal Lecter. In either case, weird, but kind of rad.

3907705445_fcefa7e8b0Munnys by benwatts

A Tron Munny! With better special effects than the early 1980s!

3907711443_8c1752a527Munnys by benwatts

Here’s another Munny by Flickr Munny maker benwatts. It’s reminiscent of the Borg from Star Trek, but a bit more organic. It’s almost as if he raided both my grandma’s couches for that fabric. We like how he has a Minolta lens as an eye. He must have a photographic memory.

3319391839_d4f7178897TK-22 Makes a New Friend by chanchan222

Domo-kun Munny and his pal meet Star Wars — it’s like a collision of fandom imagination.

3118666987_0a17a35285Munny by Derek Purdy

This Munny looks like a guy who can take care of himself. Though he’s only adorned with a classy fedora, this Munny photo has a film noir ambiance.

4097120923_a13c121f64week_04_03 by O*GE InteractiveGallery – Gaston

Here’s a monster Munny  that looks like the abominable snowman, but less abominable. I mean, look at that wittle paws and those itty bitty teeth!

rorschach munnyMU001 by De Tuesday

This Rorschach Munny is based on Alan Moore’s graphic novel, Watchmen. While he’s not the cutest of the bunch, he definitely captures the raw, nihilistic spirit of the character!

2618663998_2eced6974cBlu Spy Munny by Dan Diemer

Based off the video game, Team Fortress 2, this spy Munny is dressed to kill.

To see more, check out these Munny Flickr pools:


Do you have a favorite Munny picture? Send us a link!