Posts Tagged ‘birds’

Wildlife Photographer Disguises Himself as a Swan to Get Close to Other Birds

swanblind-7

Wildlife photographer Henryk Janowski has an awesome and ingenious way of getting close to his subjects: he swims around in a bird blind that’s designed to look like a large white swan.
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Mesmerizing Footage of Thousands Upon Thousands of Birds Dancing in the Sky

If you’re maintaining any of kind bucket list of things you’d like to experience before you die, you might want to think about putting “a massive murmuration of starlings” on that list. That’s what Paris-based director and photographer Neels Castillon was treated to recently, and his video documenting the encounter has been making waves on the web.
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Gotta Catch ‘Em All: Photog Spends Eight Years Capturing the 39 Birds of Paradise

If you’ve ever played any of the Pokémon video games, you probably know it feels like to spend hours or days trying to capture a rare monster in order to fill in another entry in your Pokédex. National Geographic photographer Tim Laman knows that feeling through his photography project titled Birds of Paradise. Laman spent a whopping eight years photographing all 39 birds-of-paradise species in the rainforests of New Guinea — the first time it has ever been done.

The behind-the-scenes video above shows how Laman spent countless hours perched atop trees, patiently waiting, hoping, and praying for the birds to land on a nearby branch.
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Beautiful Studio Portraits of Injured Birds at a Bird Sanctuary

Grounded is a project by photographer Bob Croslin that features beautiful studio portraits of birds that are recovering from injuries at a bird sanctuary.
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The Invention of the Pigeon Camera for Aerial Photography

We’ve featured a couple of projects involving cameras strapped to birds recently (see here and here), but photographing with birds is anything but a new idea. It was actually invented a little over a century ago, in 1907, by a German photography pioneer named Julius Neubronner.
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Tiny Cameras Mounted to Birds Capture What Life is Like With Wings

For nearly half a decade now, filmmaker John Downer has been pioneering the use of tiny cameras to capture photographs and videos from a bird’s-eye view — literally. He attaches extremely small and light HD cameras to the backs of birds in order to capture incredible point-of-view imagery of the animals going about their day-to-day lives.
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Photographs of Birds Caught in Mist Nets

John James Audubon, a French-American ornithologist (a person who studies birds), became internationally known in the 1800s for his ambitious goal of painting and documenting all the different bird species found in the United States. His methods, however, weren’t exactly bird friendly. To prepare his subjects, Audubon would first kill them using fine shot and then fix them into striking poses using wire.

Ornithologists these days have a much better way of capturing birds for science: mist nets. The nylon mesh nets virtually invisible to birds when suspended between two poles, and allow scientists to capture, study, and release the birds unharmed. Photographer Todd R. Forsgren wants to be the modern day equivalent of Audubon. His project titled Ornithological Photographs consists entirely of photos showing different birds caught in mist nets.
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Photos of Flamingos as Numerous as the Sand on the Seashore

Millions of flamingos

Lake Bogoria in Kenya is home to one of the world’s largest populations of lesser flamingos. When conditions are right, the lake turns into an eye-dazzling spectacle, with over a million birds congregating to feed on the blue-green algae in the waters. Wildlife photographer Martin Harvey was able to witness, shoot, and film one such gathering, and calls it “truly one of the worlds greatest wildlife experiences left on earth.”
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Use a Red Dot Sight for Locating Subjects with Super Telephoto Lenses

Photo enthusiast Chris Malcolm needed a better way to aim his 500mm lens at fast moving subjects (e.g. birds in flight), so he upgraded his lens with a DIY sighting aid by attaching a non-magnified red dot sight:

They’re designed to clamp onto a gun sight wedge mount, so some kind of adapter is required. I played with the hot shoe mount, but it was too flexible — the sight needed re-zeroing at every mount, and was easily knocked out of calibration. The degree of precision required to aim the central focus sensor at the target via the dot also made parallax error a problem on the hot shoe. So I decided to mount it directly on the lens. Least parallax error, plus the geometry of the lens barrel and the sight mount naturally lines it up with the lens. To protect the lens barrel I glued the sight clamp to a cardboard tube slightly too small, slit open to provide a sprung grab on the lens body. The slit also handily accommodates the focus hold button on the lens barrel.

Malcolm reports that the site “works amazingly well”, making it “trivially easy to aim the lens at anything very quickly”.
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Incredible Photos that Fill the Frame with Flocks of Birds

Photographer Carolyn Marks Blackwood’s Birds project contains photographs in which birds dominate the frame.
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