Posts Tagged ‘beach’

Layers of Light and Time Captured on Single Frames Using a 4×5 Camera

London-based photographer Tony Ellwood has a project called In No Time that deals with our perception and awareness of our passage of time. All the photographs are of the same pier on a beach that Ellwood visited over a period of six months. His technique, which took him 18 months to develop and perfect, involves visiting the location multiple times for each photo — sometimes up to three times a day for multiple days. Using a 4×5 large format camera, Ellwood creates each exposure across multiple sessions, as if he were doing multiple exposure photography, but of a single subject and scene. Each exposure time ranges from a few seconds to multiple hours.
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Surreal Photos of Twisty Ladders on a Misty Beach

One way to shoot surreal photographs is to capture things where they don’t ordinarily belong, whether it’s glowing cubes in a forest or houses and babies floating in mid-air. Often this type of image is done using photo manipulation, but that’s not true of the photos in artist Joy Umali’s project titled Ladders. Umali hauled a number of distorted metal ladders onto Rodeo Beach in San Francisco, and then had photographer Walter Kitundu photograph the scene.
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Photo Shoot Walkthrough: Erik Almas

Update: Looks like the video was removed


Here’s an interesting behind-the-scenes look at a photo shoot with San Francisco-based photographer Erik Almas, who walks us through his process starting from the idea stage up to the shoot.

(via ISO 1200)

World’s Largest Stop Motion Animation

Not satisfied with creating a stop-motion animation of microscopic proportions, Nokia has gone in the opposite direction, this time turning a beach into what Guinness deemed the “world’s largest stop motion animation set.” The 12-megapixel stills were shot over five days using a Nokia N8 cell phone strapped to a 40 meter high cherry picker, and the largest scene spans a whopping 11,000 square feet!
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More Limits on Photo Access to Oil Spill, Violators Face Fines and Felony Charges

There’s an increasingly overwhelming sense of frustration coming from the Gulf region, but this time, it’s coming from photographers and journalists. Media access has been tough since the beginning of the oil spill, whether on land, on beaches, or in the air.  According to a new safety zone rule passed down from the US government, reporters and photographers are not allowed within 20 meters of booms, boom operations, and other cleanup activities, except with the express permission of the US Coast Guard. CNN’s Anderson Cooper reports that the limit was originally 300 feet, but it was reduced to 65 feet.

But to complicate matters, under the new rule, anyone found “willfully” in violation of the rule would be fined $40,000 and charged with a Class D felony. Class D felonies typically carry a jail sentence. The law especially affects photographers in the area who need to be on site in order to properly cover the events.

(via A Photo Editor)