Posts Tagged ‘atomicbomb’

Haunting Photographs of Nagasaki Taken One Day After the Atomic Bomb Dropped

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This week, 24 incredible, powerful, haunting photographs will be going up on the auction block at Bonhams in New York. These are photographs that are newly-discovered, and many of them have never been seen before as they were taken with a faulty camera and never made it in front of the public eye.

They are photographs of Nagasaki, Japan, taken by celebrated Japanese military photographer Yosuke Yamahata the day after an atomic bomb was dropped on it and Hiroshima. Read more…

Rapatronic Camera: An Atomic Blast Shot at 1/100,000,000th of a Second

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This is a photo of an atomic bomb milliseconds after detonation, shot by Harold ‘Doc’ Edgerton in 1952 through his Rapatronic (Rapid Action Electronic) Camera.

The photo was shot at night through a 10 foot lens, situated 7 miles away from the blast, atop a 75 foot tower. Edgerton systematically turned on and off magnetic fields acting as the camera’s shutter, as opposed to a conventional, mechanical close.

How fast was the magnetic field shutter? 1/100,000,000th of a second. Read more…

What an Atomic Bomb Explosion Looks Like from Above and Below

On November 5, 1951, a 31 kiloton atomic bomb was dropped in the Nevada Test Site from a B-45 Tornado bomber. A camera in the air was documenting the test, and captured the video above showing what a large nuclear explosion looks like when looking down at it from above. Notice how the camera begins to shake when the shockwave of the blast reaches it.
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360-Degree Panoramas of Hiroshima After the Atomic Bomb

Six months after the atomic bomb “Little Boy” was dropped on Hiroshima, three American photographers and one Japanese photographer shot panoramas from five different locations to document the devastation. Mari Shimomura of the Hiroshima Peace Museum recently gave high-resolution scans of these panoramas to 360cities founder Jeffrey Martin, who then turned them into these 360-degree panoramas. It’s a stark and unsettling reminder of something that will hopefully never happen again.
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