Posts Tagged ‘asylum’

Compelling Photos Document the Contents of Abandoned Suitcases from a 125-Year-Old Psychiatric Center

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Willard Psychiatric Center began its life in 1869 as Willard Asylum for the Insane, closing down over 125 years later in 1995. Thousands of long-term patients passed through its doors, and when the center was shut down, it was discovered that hundreds of suitcases belonging to some of its earliest residents had been set aside and forgotten in one of the hospital’s attics.

Those suitcases and their contents have been preserved, catalogued and, thanks to photographer Jon Crispin and his compelling Willard Asylum Suitcases series, now they have been photographed as well. Read more…

Iranian President’s Photographer Defects During Assignment in New York City

Official presidential photographers lead exciting lives. President Obama’s photographer Pete Souza attends secret meetings and captures iconic photos. Georgian President Mikheil Saakashvili’s personal photographer was arrested last year after being accused of being a spy for Russia. Now Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad’s photographer is the latest to do something noteworthy: he defected to the United States.
Read more…

Time-Lapse Journey into an Abandoned Asylum Created with 35,000 Photos

Washington Times video producer Drew Geraci created this amazing time-lapse video of an asylum that was abandoned decades ago.

Opened in the early 1920s, the Asylum closed down and was abandoned decades ago. Rooms remain untouched – left as they were when the last of the employees departed. These buildings stand as a testament to the horrors and miss treatment that patients had to endure during the time of its operation.

Our 7 month journey into the Asylum led us on many adventures; from dodging security vehicles, ghostly figures and even a meth head. This is no place for the faint of heart. Asbestos blanketed every room we entered like new winter snow, so shooting was sometimes difficult.

They used a combination of traditional HDR, tone-mapping, and time-lapse techniques. Every single frame was a still photo, and they snapped 35,000 of them with two Canon 5D Mark II DSLRs over 7 months to complete the project.

(via Gizmodo)