Posts Tagged ‘astrophotography’

What Would the World Look Like If the Air Were Truly Transparent?

We could shoot astrophotos as clear as Hubble's 24-hours per day... if we weren't all dead.

Josh Velson · Mar 17, 2014 · 5 Comments » ·

Two Photos of the Orion Nebula Show Just How Far Photography Has Come

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The saying goes, “your cell phone has more computing power than all of NASA in 1969. NASA launched a man to the moon. We launched a bird into pigs.”

Thankfully, in addition to launching furious balls of feathers into evil swine, we also use our phones for taking photographs. And just as our phones have more computing power than all of NASA in 1969, our phones also have better imaging capabilities than many of the astrophotography endeavors of the past. Read more…

Fantastic Optical Zoom Time-Lapse Takes Us on a Journey to the Orion Nebula

When physics professor and amateur photographer Isidro Villo says he’s taking you on a time-lapse journey to the Orion Nebula, he means it quite literally. He doesn’t just track Orion across the sky or create yet another Milky Way time-lapse, he literally zooms from ground level all the way in until M42 takes up the entire frame. Read more…

How-To: Picking a Great Lens for Milky Way Photography

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The lens is the most important factor in the image quality of a landscape astrophoto.

There are a number of lens traits that will determine the quality and usability of a camera lens for astrophotography. Let me explain what sort of thinking should go into choosing and using a lens for making astrophotography and Milky Way nightscapes. Read more…

Spectacular Horsehead Nebula Photograph Almost Good Enough to Rival Hubble

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Photography is hardly a cheap hobby to pick up, but even within photography, some branches are more expensive than others. And ranking pretty close to the ‘most expensive’ side of that line is astrophotography… at least the kind that will yield incredible photos like the one you see here by photographer Mike Hankey. Read more…

Tilt-Shift Effect Applied to Photographs of the Cosmos to Create a ‘Tiny Universe’

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Photographs of galaxies far far away rarely convey just how large what you’re looking at really is — after all, how can you even fathom something that is measured in light years across. But these photos of the cosmos do an even worse job. By applying the tilt-shift effect in post, these photos show galaxies and nebulae look like they could fit comfortably in the palm of your hand. Read more…

NASA’s Iconic ‘Blue Marble’ Photo of Earth Turns 41 Years Old

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Backlighting can be all moody and subtle, but you can seldom go wrong with full-on, straight-behind illumination. Especially if your subject is the planet on which your family, friends and all of humanity happens to reside.

That’s what the trio of Apollo 17 astronauts — and soon, the whole world — discovered 41 years and two days ago today. Navigating towards the moon on Dec. 7, 1972,  the spacecraft had the sun behind it, providing a rare, fully illuminated view of the Earth. Read more…

Hubble Photographs Messier 15, One of the Densest Clusters of Stars Ever Discovered

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Once in a while we peer into the heavens and show you a photograph that even the richest and most gifted of photographers can’t match. And that’s the case today, because what you see above is a photo of the Messier 15 (or M15) cluster of stars taken by the Hubble Space Telescope. Read more…

Striking 13-Photo Composite Captures Two Galaxies and a Comet in the Same Image

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We’ve found reason to share Czech astrophotographer Miloslav Druckmüller‘s breathtaking work once before when we showed you his composite of a total solar eclipse. Now he’s back with another composite image that shows a nightscape the likes of which you’ve probably never seen before. Read more…

Stunning Time-Lapse of the Mauna Kea Observatories and the Milky Way

Nothing starts your weekend off on the right foot like an epic time-lapse, and that’s exactly what we have for you here. Put together by an astronomy grad student at the University of Hawaii, this beautiful film captures the goings on at the Mauna Kea Observatories, one of the best places to study astronomy (and take some stunning astrophotography) in the Northern Hemisphere. Read more…