Posts Tagged ‘art’

Why Gursky’s Photo of the Rhine is the World’s Most Expensive Photo

The art world was abuzz last week after Andreas Gursky’s photograph Rhein II sold at auction for a ground-breaking $4.3 million. The print may be Plexiglas-mounted, signed, and gigantic (it’s nearly 12 feet wide), but the price had many people scratching their heads. Thankfully, there has been no shortage of articles written since to explain things to uncultured folk who don’t understand the astronomical prices paid for fine art.
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Art Exhibit Lets Visitors Swim in 24 Hours Worth of Flickr Photos… Literally

To show how the Internet is causing us to “drown in pictures”, artist Erik Kessels created an installation featuring prints of every single photograph uploaded to Flickr within a 24-hour period. The 1 million+ photos are piled up nearly to the ceiling, and spill into multiple rooms. The exhibit is part of an exhibition titled “What’s Next?” at Foam in Amsterdam.

(via Foam via Creative Review via Craftzine)

Gursky World: A Portrait of Photographer Andreas Gursky

German photographer Andreas Gursky is one of the most successful artists of our time, and yesterday a print of his titled “Rhein II” became the world’s most expensive photograph, selling for $4.3 million. Back in the early 2000s, director Ben Lewis made this interesting 23-minute feature that gives an inside look into “Gursky World.”

(via TOP)

Gursky Photo of Rhine Sells for $4.3M, Becomes World’s Most Expensive Pic

Despite what you might think, this isn’t some random snapshot we found online — it’s actually the world’s most expensive photograph. Titled “Rhein II”, it’s a 1999 photograph by Andreas Gursky showing the Rhine river. Last night it sold for a whopping $4,338,500 at Christie’s.

Gursky has become quite the Midas of photographers: this is his second photo to claim the title of “world’s most expensive”, with the first being 99 Cent II Diptychon ($3.89M and now the 4th most expensive).

(via Christie’s via NSoP)

The Amazing Light Painting Photography of Brian Hart

Artist Brian Hart creates amazingly detailed light painting photographs, sometimes spending nearly 20 minutes exposing a single one. The above photo, titled “apartment light drawing”, took 17 minutes to draw.
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Photographs Recreated Inside a Computer Game

New media artist Kent Sheely took some of his old photographs and recreated them inside the sandbox physics game Garry’s Mod. Each “virtual photo” took about 2-3 hours to recreate: Sheely had to pick out models, set up objects, tweak details, and position everything while looking through the stationary camera view in the game.
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Crazy Photo Project: One Self-Portrait Every Hour, For an Entire Year

Daily photo projects have become quite popular as of late, and a number of viral time-lapse videos feature people who take one self-portrait a day over many years. However, if you think taking a photo every day requires a crazy amount of dedication, you ain’t seen nothing yet.

For an entire year, from April 11, 1980 through April 11, 1981, legendary performance artist Tehching Hsieh punched a time clock and took a self-portrait every hour (i.e. 24 times a day) on the hour. At the end of the year, he ended up with 8,760 photos and combined them into a time-lapse video showing the passing of a year (and the growth of his hair). Now that’s crazy!


Thanks for sending in the tip, Lloyd!

Photos Recreating Famous Works of Art

Booooooom and Adobe have partnered up for a photo project and contest called “Remake“, which asks people to recreate famous works of art using photography.
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Street Art that Points Old School Cameras at Passers-By

Street artists Jana & JS visit cities across Europe and paint portraits of themselves (and sometimes others) shooting with various film cameras. Each piece first starts out as a photograph, which is then turned into a stencil that’s used to put up the painting.
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Singer Bob Dylan Accused of Plagiarizing Photographs

Singer Bob Dylan is being accused of plagiarism after several paintings in his recent art show were found to have “striking resemblances” to works by photographers such as Henri Cartier-Bresson, Dmitri Kessel and Léon Busy. An example is Dylan’s painting titled Opium (above left), which appears to be directly copied from Busy’s Vietnam (above right). A Flickr user also found that Dylan had copied six photographs — one of which an artificial Photoshop edit — from his Flickr stream.
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