Posts Tagged ‘art’

Polaroid Pictures Recreated with Thread

The Portrait Project is a series of 10 stitched portraits by London-based artist Evelin Kasikov. Each portrait is created with an actual Polaroid picture as the starting point, and is based on the same grid. The idea is similar to pointillism, but instead of dots she uses squares, crosses, and lines of different colors and weights. 10-15 feet of cotton thread does into each piece, and stitching them takes between two days and a week to complete.
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Marc Jacobs Slaps Graffitied Store Photo onto Shirt, Gets Last Laugh

Don’t mess with Marc Jacobs. That’s the lesson graffiti artists should take from a teensy little altercation between Marc Jacobs and the infamous graffiti artist Kidult. When Marc Jacobs employees awoke to a vandalized Soho boutique the morning after the Met Ball, they snapped a few photos before starting to clean it up. But instead of just stopping there and moving on, Marc Jacobs decided instead to turn the whole thing on its head, slap the photo on a t-shirt, and sell it with the caption “Art by Art Jacobs.”
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Amazing Shadow Photos Created Using Carefully Arranged Objects

Tim Noble and Sue Webster are a London-based artist duo that creates amazing shadow art installations using carefully arranged objects. They use everything from trash to metal cans shot with BB pellets, arranged to cast shadows of people and skylines on the wall when a light is shined from a certain direction.
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‘______.jpg’: Ceramic Sculptures of the Apple JPG Preview Icon

Artist Alan Belcher is known for pioneering a genre of art known as “photo-object” in which the disciplines of photography and sculpture are fused and explored in different ways. His latest piece is titled “_____.jpg”, and consists of 125 ceramic sculptures of the ubiquitous Apple JPG icon. Each one was manufactured in China and then signed, numbered, and dated. They’re currently on display at the Marianne Boesky Gallery in Manhattan. You can see a close-up view of the tile here.

(via Doobybrain and jockohomo)

Amazing “Real Time” Clocks Created Using 12-Hour-Long Loops of Video

Artist Maarten Baas has a project called “Real Time” in which he creates one-of-a-kind clocks using a video camera and boatloads of patience and dedication. He creates 12-hour-long loops of people manually setting the time on various clocks… in real time. The video above shows his grandfather clock exhibit in which the hour and minute hands of the clock are painstakingly drawn in every minute of every hour for twelve hours.
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An Artist Goes Undercover at a JC Penney Portrait Studio

Hyperallergic has published an essay about a project titled Free Sitting done by artist Nora Herting, who got a job as a photographer at a JC Penny portrait studio for the project. Here’s the essay’s description of the project:

The portrait serves a testament to the subjects’ prosperity and personal relations, and yet, despite the time and care people take when having their pictures taken at commercial studios, the resulting photographs are rarely considered aesthetic objects. They are documentation. Herting’s work questions what, exactly, we are documenting in this benign, constructed way.

The studio-portrait experience has a structured set of parameters that form a stylistic equation. When participating in this process we become blind to its constructs. Artists disrupt and violate codes and, in doing so, bring them to our attention. Herting breaks the rules of the studio portrait, and the resulting photographs no longer fulfill their role as social symbols. Images programmed to be evidence of happiness or prosperity become painful, ugly or embarrasing, possibly revealing something unseen before.

If you can wrap your mind around this, please leave a comment with your translation or interpretation.

An Artist Goes Undercover at a JC Penney Portrait Studio (via MetaFilter via Nerdcore)


Image credits: Photographs by Nora Herting

Abstract Images of Famous Landmarks Created by Blending Snapshots

“The Collective Snapshot” is a series by Spanish photographer Pep Ventosa (previously featured here) that consists of abstract images of famous landmarks created by blending together dozens of ordinary snapshots. His goal is to “create an abstraction of the places we’ve been an the things we’ve seen”, and to create images that are both familiar and foreign at the same time.
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Art Collector Sues William Eggleston for Selling New Prints of Iconic Photos

Last month we reported that 36 digital pigment prints of photos by William Eggleston had been auctioned off for a whopping $5.9 million. At least one man wasn’t too happy about the news: a New York-based art collector named Jonathan Sobel has filed a lawsuit against Eggleston, claiming that the photographer’s decisions to sell new, oversized prints of his iconic images has diluted the resale value of the originals. Sobel owns one of the largest private collections of Eggleston’s photographs — 192 photos worth an estimated $5 million. He is seeking unspecified damages and also a ban to prevent Eggleston from making new prints of his 1960s suburbia photos.

(via WSJ)

JR and Liu Bolin Team Up for a Photo of JR Blending into a Photo of Liu Bolin

JR (the TED-winning photographer who uses giant photos as street art) and Liu Bolin (the Chinese artist who photographs himself blending into scenes) recently got together to collaborate on a photograph taken by Liu Bolin in which JR blends into one of his large scale installations. The giant photograph that Liu Bolin helped blend JR into is a photo of Liu Bolin’s eye, created by JR. Can you say “photo inception”?
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Man Buys Priceless Warhol Sketch at Garage Sale for $5

A fascinating story from the art world: back in 2010, British businessman Andy Fields purchased a collection of 5 paintings from a Las Vegas garage sale for $5. When he decided to have one of the paintings reframed, he discovered an early Andy Warhol sketch hidden behind it. The signed drawing is believed to be of 1930s singer Rudy Vallee and created when Warhol was just 10 years old. Warhol paintings fetch absurd prices on the auction block — the artist is considered to be the bellwether of the art market — and the sketch is estimated to be worth a whopping $2 million.

The story is reminiscent of the $45 garage sale photos that were reportedly lost Ansel Adams works. Although initially estimated to be worth $200 million, the story fizzled after evidence emerged that the images were likely created by an “Uncle Earl”.

(via Boing Boing)