Posts Tagged ‘aperture’

What’s the Fastest Lens Theoretically Possible? And What Would it Look Like?

We’ve told you about some pretty fast lenses in the past — from the legendary Zeiss 50mm f/0.7 lenses made for NASA and used by Stanley Kubrick to film a candle light scene, to X-Ray lenses that you can try to Frankenstein onto your camera body for some strange soft-focus results.

But what is the fastest lens that is theoretically possible? And what would that lens look like? Matt Granger answers those exact questions in the interesting technical video above. Read more…

A Simple Explanation of the Optics Behind Pinholes, Camera Apertures, and Your Eye

If you’ve never thought to find out why aperture works the way it does, you should definitely check out this simple explanation of optics, aperture and pinholes by MinutePhysics. Read more…

Adobe Just Released a Simple and Free Aperture to Lightroom Migration Plugin

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If you’ve been looking to migrate your Aperture library over to Lightroom ever since the official announcement of Aperture’s demise, you’ve had to be content with manually doing it or using one of the unofficial tools that had already been released. But that is no longer the case.

Earlier today, Adobe officially released its own tool: a free Lightroom plugin that will allow you to import your entire Aperture (or iPhoto) library, metadata and all, quickly and easily. Read more…

Simple GIF Shows How Stopping Down the Aperture Affects Depth of Field

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Here’s a simple little GIF that can come in handy the next time you’re asked to explain how aperture and depth of field work. Created by Reddit user veedees, it shows exactly how stopping down your lens from f/1.8 all the way to f/16 translates into different depths of field. Read more…

Your Lens’ Aperture Might Be Lying to You, Or: The Difference Between F Stops and T Stops

We all understand what an F stop is and how it’s a vital component in ensuring we have a properly exposed image, but have you ever heard of a T Stop? While they might not be as relevant to you in your day-to-day photography as F-stops, knowing what they are will give you a better understanding of how your glass works.

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Zone Focusing: How to Use Those Markings On Your Lens You Might Have Never Used Before

You’ll seen all those markings on lenses, but do you know what all of them are there for? Some of you might, but for those who don’t or are looking for a refresher, YouTube user Tim Heubeck has put together a quick little how-to that introduces you to the numbers on the front of the lens that are used for zone focusing — a method of focusing that’s particularly useful in street photography. Read more…

Phase One’s Capture One Pro 8 Update Takes Aim at Ex-Aperture Users, Adds Subscription Model

Capture One Pro 8, images by Kamil Tamiola

Phase One is making the most of Photokina by announcing a complete overhaul to its popular Capture One Pro software. Now on version 8.0, the updated program not only improves upon its former self, but also looks to squeeze in more of the market share by enticing ex-Aperture users who are looking for simple migration to a semi-familiar interface. Read more…

Adobe Officially Working On Aperture to Lightroom Migration Tool, Releases Accompanying Guide

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It’s been roughly a month since Apple announced it’s discontinuing its professional-level photo management and editing software, Aperture. Today, Adobe has officially taken its stance on the situation, making two-and-a-half new announcements.

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New App and Plugin Tonality Brings Black & White Darkroom Magic to OSX

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From the creators of photo-editing apps, Intensify, Focus and FX Photo Studio comes a new black and white image editor for Mac called Tonality. Both a standalone app and plugin for Photoshop, Lightroom and Aperture, Tonality is versatile in its implementation into your workflow.

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Understanding Aperture: Why Shooting Wide Open Isn’t Always the Best Choice

When you drop hundreds or thousands of dollars on a new piece of fast glass, it’s natural to want to shoot it wide-open until the focusing ring falls off. But, the idea that for all portraits you want to be wide open and for all landscapes you want to be stopped down isn’t true. Here to explain in the above video is photographer Matt Granger.

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