Posts Tagged ‘antialiasingfilter’

Nikon Unveils AA Filterless D3300, 35mm f/1.8G FX Lens and New CoolPix Cameras

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The CES announcement train keeps on rolling with another one we saw coming thanks to the ever-increasing accuracy of rumor sites. Nikon has officially launched the consumer-level D3300 — complete with a few hardware upgrades and a new kit lens — as well as the long-rumored 35mm f/1.8G full-frame lens and a few new CoolPix models. Read more…

Ricoh Unveils the Pentax K-3, a Beast of an APS-C Shooter with a Selectable AA Filter

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The K-3 webpage leaked yesterday (and along with it much of the information we now have) but now we’re done with leaks and rumors: Ricoh Imaging’s Pentax K-3 is official. A beastly APS-C shooter with a stacked spec sheet, the camera is sure to please serious photographers. Read more…

Ricoh Accidentally Launches K-3 Webpage Early, Have a Look at What’s to Come

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We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again, October is looking to be a big month for camera announcements. And of course, along with announcements come leaks. Case in point: the upcoming Pentax K-3 isn’t supposed to be announced for another 24 hours or so, but someone at Ricoh accidentally let the webpage go live briefly. Read more…

New Nikon Patent Shows On/Off Switch for Anti-Aliasing Filter

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When Nikon released its D800E and D7100, people were surprised to learn that these models did without the Optical Low Pass Filter (aka. the Anti-Aliasing Filter). The resulting images from these cameras were sharper, but more easily fell pray to moire patterns in certain situations — in other words, it was a tradeoff.

But Nikon would like you to have your cake and eat it too, at least according to a recent patent the company filed with the Japanese Patent Office. Read more…

Sony RX1R Bests the RX1 in Sharpness by Ditching the Anti-Aliasing Filter

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Sony now has two full frame compact cameras in its lineup—kinda. The company today announced the RX1R, a souped up (or perhaps stripped down?) version of the RX1 that shoots sharper photographs by ditching the anti-aliasing filter in front of the sensor. Aside from the lack of an AA filter, the RX1R and its sibling are virtually identical cameras.
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“To Omit an Alias Filter… Is like Building a Sports Car with No Brakes”

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Last week, we pointed you to a piece by the New York Times on how Fujifilm is attempting to kill moiré without killing sharpness by designing its sensors in a way that eschews the traditional anti-aliasing filters used in digital cameras. Photographer Martin Doppelbauer disagrees with Fuji’s claims: he has published a piece arguing that, “digital cameras without aliasing filters are cameras with a built-in design flaw“:

To omit an alias filter in front of a digital image sensors is like building a sports car with no brakes. Of course, the car accelerates a little faster due to the lower weight and the cornering ability is also better due to the smaller unsprung weight – but ultimately it lacks an essential functional element.

For analog cameras, an alias filter is not required: ​​Film has no sharply defined limit of resolution. It loses contrast and resolution gradually with increasingly higher frequencies. You could say, the low-pass filter is already incorporated in the film itself.

[…] By omitting the alias filter, the recorded image information […] does not increase! Even though images of cameras without aliasing filters may appear sharper and crisper: Images of cameras with a proper alias filter can easily be re-sharpened to achieve the same visual impression – without side effects.

So according to Doppelbauer, the recent fascination with removing anti-aliasing filters is more based in marketing rather than science.

Alias-filters: Yes or No? [Martin Doppelbauer]