Posts Tagged ‘animation’

Clever Animation Technique Using a Bike Tire, Some Paper, and a Video Camera

For her 3rd year dissertation project Katy Beveridge set out to find a creative way to film animation in real time rather through techniques like stop-motion. She then came up with the brilliant idea of placing paper on a bike wheel and using a video camera’s — and the human eye’s — frame rate limitations to create the animation.

Amazing Stop-Motion Music Video Made Using 920 Colored Pencils

Here’s another cool example of what’s possible when you combine creativity with an insane amount of dedication: animator Jonathan Chong spent hundreds of hours creating this stop motion video for the song “Against The Grain” by the Australian band Hudson. He animated everything by hand, and captured 5125 individual photographs of 920 pencils for the three-minute long finished product.
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Stop-Motion Music Video Shot Over Two Years with 288,000 Jelly Beans

Want to see what pure dedication looks like? This music video for the song “In Your Arms” by Kina Grannis is a stop-motion animation done with a background composed of jelly beans. It’s a crazy project that required 22 months, 1,357 hours, 30 people, and 288,000 jelly beans. They could have used CGI, of course, but each frame was carefully created by hand and photographed with a still camera. It’s even more mind-blowing given this fact: none of it was done with a green screen.
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‘What is Life?’ Stop Motion Animation Created with Light Painting

“What is Life?” is a creative stop motion animation created by a group of students at the MAPS Film School in South Australia, featuring the responses of people around the world who were asked that three-word question. Every single frame in the video is an individual light-painting photograph drawn with lights and torches and captured through a long-exposure shot.

Creative Stop-Motion Animation Brings Sunlight to Life

“What Light” is an incredible stop-motion video that features sunlight dancing around a bedroom. It might look like it was done with CGI, but the sunlight was actually manipulated using cut-outs and stencils placed in the window. Creator Sarah Wickens says,

I noticed how the sun came through the windows in my bedroom, creating patches of light that moved throughout the day, as the sun changed position in the sky. So I started experimenting with ways of using that light to make animation, sticking cut-outs and stencils on to my windows to carve the light into different shapes [#]

The result of her efforts is one of the most creative stop-motion videos we’ve seen.

(via zefrank)

Wedding Photographs Turned into a Stop-Motion Video

New Zealand-based wedding photographer Delphine Ducaruge takes photos from her wedding shoots and combines them into creative stop-motion animations. You can find more of them over on her Vimeo page.

Delphine Photography (via Xatakafoto)

Time-Lapse Video of a Stop-Motion Video Being Made

Here’s a creative way to offer a behind-the-scenes look at how a stop-motion video is created: while animator Barry Purves was slowly moving a puppet and snapping frames, a separate camera was used to photograph Barry doing the animating, creating a time-lapse video that shows how the doll was brought to life.

(via Fstoppers)

World’s Largest Stop Motion Animation

Not satisfied with creating a stop-motion animation of microscopic proportions, Nokia has gone in the opposite direction, this time turning a beach into what Guinness deemed the “world’s largest stop motion animation set.” The 12-megapixel stills were shot over five days using a Nokia N8 cell phone strapped to a 40 meter high cherry picker, and the largest scene spans a whopping 11,000 square feet!
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World’s First Stop-Motion Animation Done with Fake Fingernails

It’s not a microscope stop-motion animation, but this stop-motion ad Kia created for its 2012 Picanto is pretty incredible. Over the course of 25 days and nights, they used 1200 bottles of nail polish to paint 900 individual fake fingernails. Each nail took a whopping 2 hours to paint.

To get something to go viral these days you need to go big, like spend six-months building a Rube Goldberg machine or assemble 250 DSLRs and flashes into an “LED” display.

(via Laughing Squid)

How to Make Your Own Cinemagraphs

Photographer Jamie Beck has done quite a bit lately to popularize the “cinemagraph“: Harry Potter-esque photos that are given an extra dimension by adding a dash of animation. If you want to learn how to make your own, Photojojo recently published a great tutorial on how to make them using Photoshop. Photographers Fernando Baez and Christopher Mathew Burt have also published tutorials and some helpful tips.


Image credit: Photograph by Jamie Beck